promotion · young adult

Cover Reveal: Don’t Kiss the Messenger

Hey all! Today I’m very excited to bring a super cute cover reveal to all of you! It’s YA, it’s romance, and it’s a retelling–if you’ve been here long enough,  you’ll know I’m immediately attracted to anything that’s an interesting retelling, so I am already a huge fan!

book: don’t kiss the messenger
author
: katie ray
For most of her teenage life, CeCe Edmonds has been dealing with the stares and the
not-so- polite whispers that follow her around Edgelake High. So she has a large scar
on her face—Harry Potter had one on his forehead and people still liked him. CeCe
never cared about her looks—until Emmett Brady, transfer student and football
darling, becomes her literature critique partner. The only problem? Emmett is
blindsided by Bryn DeNeuville, CeCe’s gorgeous and suddenly shy volleyball
teammate. Bryn asks CeCe to help her compose messages that’ll charm Emmett.
CeCe isn’t sure there’s anything in his head worth charming but agrees
anyway—she’s a sucker for a good romance. Unfortunately, the more messages she
sends and the more they run into each other, the more she realizes there’s plenty in
his head, from food to literature. Too bad Emmett seems to be falling for the wrong
girl…

Disclaimer: This Entangled Teen Crush book involves one fiercely scarred girl who
wants the new guy in town, the new guy who thinks he wants the new girl, and the
new girl who really isn’t sure what she wants, and the misunderstanding that brings
them all together. You’ll laugh, you’ll swoon, you’ll fall in love.

 

KR_EHS1_DontKisstheMessenger FINAL COVER

Check back next month for an amazing author guest post and a book review!

 

5 stars · series · young adult

Scythe by Neal Shusterman: chilling and amazing

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Scythe

Arc of a Scythe #1

author : neal shusterman

pages : [hardcover] 435

memorable quote :

“You have three hundred sixty-five days of immunity.” And then, looking him in the eye, said, “And I’ll be seeing you on day three hundred sixty-six.”

favorite character :  scythe faraday

summary :

Thou shalt kill.

A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery. Humanity has conquered all those things, and has even conquered death. Now scythes are the only ones who can end life—and they are commanded to do so, in order to keep the size of the population under control.

Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe—a role that neither wants. These teens must master the “art” of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.

review :

I’ve never met a Neal Shusterman novel I haven’t loved.

Honestly, he’s one of the best, most creative, most terrifying authors out there. His books will captivate you until the very end because you honestly cannot predict what will happen next. He’s the kind of author more than willing to kill off any character, so no one is safe–especially not in these worlds he builds. Which is a little ironic, because Scythe is in a way about a society of immortal people.

Imagine a world where people kill themselves for fun. You jump off of a building ten stories up and know in three or four days you’ll be fully healed–best of all, that first fix is free. Legally, they aren’t allowed to not bring you back. No one left in the world remembers a time when everyone born knew that they had only a certain amount of time left to live. Now, death is controlled by the Scythes. They are the only ones who can kill–or ‘glean’, as they call it to make it sound less like murder–and after they’ve chosen someone, they die for good. They’re really the only things to fear in this new world.

I loved this book. But it literally gave me nightmares. I’d stay up just to see how much I could read before I’d really have to get to sleep, and this is the kind of plot sure to give you an existential crisis. There’s some talk about what the point of life is when in the past, all of those people were going to die, anyway. But without death, or war, or hunger, or anything to struggle against, and with even nanites in their blood to keep them from feeling anything too strongly, there’s no art. No inspiration for it. People have all of these years and they just don’t know what to do with themselves in that time. It’s why Rowan and Citra are intrigued by the idea of becoming a scythe’s apprentice; it gives them each a purpose in life.

They each tell part of the story and  I loved hearing each of their voices. Essentially, they’re having the same life experience, but it impacts and twists them in completely different directions. Still, this is the one decision that will unite them forever, although they hadn’t known one another before the apprenticeship.

I don’t want to say anything more because I don’t want to give anything away. I mean, even in the summary of the book it says something that doesn’t happen until halfway through the book. This is the kind of novel you should dive into and just let yourself be immersed in the world and the characters.

It’s so good. I don’t think I can say that enough. Book two can’t come to me fast enough!

5/5 stars

 

giveaway · promotion · young adult

GIVEAWAY and Spotlight: Ultimatum by K.M. Walton

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Ultimatum was released March 7, 2017! Check the bottom of this post for a chance to win a copy of the book!

From the author of Cracked and Empty comes a gripping, emotional story of two brothers who must make the ultimate decision about what’s more important: family or their differences.

It’s not Oscar’s fault he’s misunderstood. Ever since his mother died, he’s been disrespected by his father and bullied by his self-absorbed older brother, so he withdraws from his fractured family, seeking refuge in his art.

Vance wishes his younger brother would just loosen up and be cool. It was hard enough to deal with their mother’s death without Oscar getting all emotional. At least when Vance pushes himself in lacrosse and parties, he feels alive.

But when their father’s alcoholism sends him into liver failure, the two brothers must come face-to-face with their demons–and each other–if they are going to survive a very uncertain future.

read an except from ultimatum:

I watch the nurse jab the needle into my father’s arm. He doesn’t make a move. He hasn’t made a move on his own in days. I look over at my brother, Vance, and his head is down, lost in his phone. I close my eyes and just focus on breathing.

I feel a gentle squeeze on my shoulder. “That should make him comfortable, Oscar. I’ll be right out in the hall if you need me,” the nurse says.

Vance told me that since Dad had this thing called a living will with a do-not-resuscitate order, there are no IVs or breathing tubes or anything else that will help to keep him alive longer. His liver is in failure, and he doesn’t have time to wait for a transplant. He will not be coming home from this place.

I nod. “Thank you,” I say to the nurse. Why can’t my brother put down his phone and be present?

“How long now?” I whisper. I read her name tag: Barbara.

She purses her lips into a tight smile. “I wish I could tell you. Definitely not today.”

“Tomorrow?” This is the end of day two here at the hospice, and I’ve been told multiple times that he’s not in pain, that they’re doing everything they can to make him comfortable. But I’m not convinced. How do they know he’s not in pain?

Barbara tilts her head and looks back at my comatose father. “Maybe, maybe not. He’ll leave when he’s ready.”

I want to jump up and shake her. She’s a damn hospice nurse! How can she not know? I want her to know.

I want her to tell me when he will die.

Sitting here watching him fail like this, so close, is harder than watching him live. I want it to just be over. I’m done.

“How many times does she have to tell you that she doesn’t know?” Vance asks after she leaves.

I turn away and ignore my brother.

“I know you hear me,” Vance says.

I lift my eyes and stare into his. To annoy him, I put in my earbuds and turn up the volume as loud as my phone allows. He shakes his head, indicating that he can hear the Mozart. Good.

My head fills with the layered richness of Symphony No. 29, and I let my eyes slide closed. While I’m into everything from baroque to classical to romantic, Mozart has always been my favorite. When I listen to his music, I’m taken out of my life.

My life right now consists of being trapped in this damn room with my brother and watching my father slip away one labored breath at a time. If I count the freckles on Dad’s arm one more time, I may start drooling.

I steal a peek at Vance, and he’s still glaring at me. When isn’t he? Having Mozart drown out him and his never-ending dickhead ways is helping right now. I turn and gaze out the window.

Vance has never understood me—and he never will. Even down to the music I listen to. When we were in middle school, he’d make fun of me because of it. I can still see him playing an imaginary violin with wild, insulting movements, doing everything in his power to look weird.

Were Vance and I ever close? I blink and realize the answer. No, we’ve never been close—despite only being ten months apart.

I scroll back as far as I can remember, and my hands tighten into fists.

I think it’s the classic “he took my place as the baby” situation. Vance resents me—like, my very existence. He couldn’t be any more unbrotherly. In fact, I’d say he stands firmly behind enemy lines. Let’s just say that if I needed saving on the battlefield, Vance would probably let me bleed out.

My brother is an attention junkie, and apparently I robbed him of having our parents’ complete and undivided focus. He has never verbalized this to me, of course—that would involve a deep conversation between us. This is all pure guesswork on my part. But I know I’m right.

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5 stars · fiction · young adult

Love and First Sight; an extremely adorable and awesome contemporary

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Love and First Sight

author : josh sundquist

pages :[hardcover] 281

favorite character : will

summary :

Love is more than meets the eye.

On his first day at a new school, blind sixteen-year-old Will Porter accidentally groped a girl on the stairs, sat on another student in the cafeteria, and somehow drove a classmate to tears. High school can only go up from here, right?

As Will starts to find his footing, he develops a crush on a sweet but shy girl named Cecily. And despite his fear that having a girlfriend will make him inherently dependent on someone sighted, the two of them grow closer and closer. Then an unprecedented opportunity arises: an experimental surgery that could give Will eyesight for the first time in his life. But learning to see is more difficult than Will ever imagined, and he soon discovers that the sighted world has been keeping secrets. It turns out Cecily doesn’t meet traditional definitions of beauty—in fact, everything he’d heard about her appearance was a lie engineered by their so-called friends to get the two of them together. Does it matter what Cecily looks like? No, not really. But then why does Will feel so betrayed?

review :

This book was extremely cute, and I loved every minute of it!

Love and First Sight is a very fast read. I flew through it in a day, because every time I reached a new chapter I simply had to know what was going to happen next. It isn’t even that this novel is action-packed or filled with plot twists; the characters and what they’re going through was just so interesting, I couldn’t get enough of it.

Will is transitioning at school where he’s the only one without sight. I’ve always had the greatest respect for how the visually impaired navigate a world that isn’t really attuned to their talents. Will can easily memorize routes through school, how many steps and turns it takes to get him from one close to another, but if someone was guiding him for instance they wouldn’t realize he can’t orient himself by visual landmarks.

I loved how not everyone in the book knows how to handle Will, because it isn’t a glossed-over representation of his life. People fail at explaining things to him because they compare one visual to another when he has no reference for either. They don’t understand why he can’t simply imagine colors. But he finds himself a great group of friends who, though they make mistakes, keep pushing toward a better understanding of Will.

The interesting concept here–that an experimental surgery could potential restore someone’s sight–completely captivated me. Will’s thoughts are an emotional turmoil and it’s easy to follow his progression from elation, to uncertainty, and worry. Will’s been blind his entire life, so to think that could all change completely rocks the foundation of his world.

I can’t wait to read more by this author! His writing was very light and fun, a good counterbalance to the heavy topics here. I can’t recommend this book enough.

5/5stars

 

3 stars · fairy tale · young adult

Spelled by Betsy Schow is a fun mashup of fairytale madness

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Spelled

author : betsy schow

pages : [paperback] 345

favorite character : kato

summary :

Fairy Tale Survival Rule #32: If you find yourself at the mercy of a wicked witch, sing a romantic ballad and wait for your Prince Charming to save the day.

Yeah, no thanks. Dorthea is completely princed out. Sure being the crown princess of Emerald has its perks—like Glenda Original ball gowns and Hans Christian Louboutin heels. But a forced marriage to the brooding prince Kato is so not what Dorthea had in mind for her enchanted future.

Talk about unhappily ever after.

Trying to fix her prince problem by wishing on a (cursed) star royally backfires, leaving the kingdom in chaos and her parents stuck in some place called “Kansas.” Now it’s up to Dorthea and her pixed off prince to find the mysterious Wizard of Oz and undo the curse…before it releases the wickedest witch of all and spells The End for the world of Story.

review :

If you’re someone who doesn’t have the patience for unlikable narrators, then Spelled isn’t the one for you. If you’re like me and can put up with Dot’s shenanigans, then I think you’ll really enjoy this book.

Spelled is the first in a series about fairy tales ranging from The Wizard of Oz to Cinderella to Greek mythology. There’s a little bit of everything in here, and it’s kind of awesome that even major fairy tales will just have a minor shoutout in the background of a scene. How casually it’s all thrown together just shows how usual this is for Dot, when her entire life revolves around these magical things and the so-called ‘rules’ of story that ensure the good guys win every time. All until Dot ruins the magic holding her world together and everything about happily ever after seems to become its opposite.

Dot is forced on a wild adventure with extremely unlikely (and also kind of unlikable) companions. It’s a little strange that out of three main characters, not a single one of them is inherently pleasant. I wasn’t sure of how to feel about that at first, but this isn’t your typical fairy tale. Just like Dot is fighting to get her normal life back together, she’s also fighting the magically satisfying character growth that’s coming her way.

And the worldbuilding was excellent! I love the nods to original stories, like Dot’s magical heels. Familiar but unique, all at once. The patchwork quality of the land was great as well, because you never knew which story connected with the other and would cause more magical mayhem.

This is a very quick and fun read that doesn’t take itself too seriously. I’ll definitely be reading more of the series!

3.5/5 stars

Uncategorized

The Haters by Jesse Andrews: Maybe I should have DNF’d?

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The Haters

author : jesse andrews

pages : [hardcover] 352

summary :

Do you have a favorite band?

Okay. Good. Unfortunately, it also sucks. And Wes and Corey can tell you exactly how.

There is nothing Wes and Corey can’t hate on. Even bands they love. In fact, they are incapable of loving anything without relentlessly figuring out ways to hate it, too.

And so when they are sent to a place as soul-crushing as jazz camp—which is populated almost completely by competitive maniacs who are trying to seem chill by talking in Jazz Voice—Wes and Corey hate on it with extreme prejudice. Fortunately, so does a girl named Ash, who may even be a bigger and better hater than the two of them combined.

When the three of them run away from camp, start their own band, and go on tour, it seems like a great idea. Except that they are faced with a basically unanswerable question: How can confirmed haters even try to make music that maybe doesn’t suck?

The answer takes the form of a catastrophic, hilarious, romantically tangled road trip from Jesse Andrews, bestselling author of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. You can feel free to hate on it. But you can also love it, too. Because maybe those are kind of the same thing.

review :

I was super excited to read this book because obviously I’ve read Andrews’ previous book (I don’t know many people who don’t know something about Me and Earl and the Dying Girl) and think he has a really great, unique way of telling stories. Unfortunately this one didn’t really do it for me.

I went into The Haters without knowing too much about it. I briefly read some of the front flap and then dove right in. I have to admit that I know next to nothing about jazz, was surprised to see a contemporary book all about jazz music, and then was a little excited because that’s something new, something cool. And then within the next few dozen pages, all of that disappeared with only a few more references to jazz musicians and not much else.

I think what made it so hard for me to get into this book and the road trip is that there’s no real end goal. Wes himself acknowledges that none of them are actually good at playing music, yet they continue to do so, and they have no real destination in their journey. They all abandon their cell phones because it will be the ‘cool’ thing to do. That’s basically their justification for a lot of the illegal things they do, too. I do like that at the end of this novel, the character need to face real consequences for what they’ve done. That isn’t something that happens a lot in YA so I was actually pleased to see that.

But, at the end of The Haters, I don’t feel like I came away with much else. A lot of the book is taken up by dialogue of Wes and Corey hating on various things, making a bunch of jokes I guess high school guys always make, and then . . . not much else. It just wasn’t the one for me.

2/5 stars

4 stars · dystopia · Fantasy · reread review

Reread Reflection: Never Fade by Alexandra Bracken

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How do you review a book after you’ve already read it? Review the reread!

I absolutely loved The Darkest Minds which was the first book in this trilogy. When I finally got my hands on book three, I remembered pretty clearly what happened in that book and was less certain about Never Fade. That calls for a reread!

First of all, I have to admit Never Fade suffers from the second book slump. I like it, but nowhere near with the passion of how I loved book one. This involves more of the political intrigue, a lot less of the action. There’s a lot happening but it’s all verbal plot twists, not exactly action scenes, except for probably the very first and last scenes of the book. Ruby shuts down so much when she’s around the League that it’s hard to get a read on her for . . kind of anything, which leads to an unfortunate monotone in places when she’s trying not to feel and all.

There are some pretty good plot twists in here, though, and those easily kept me reading. I mean, it’s kind of like you’re thinking nothing else could go worse, and then everything goes much worse than you could ever think possible.

Before this reread, I couldn’t remember too much about Never Fade apart from pieces of the end of the book. And then I kept thinking, no, that couldn’t possibly be how it ends . . . but it does, and it still makes me a mixture of sad and angry. All in all, it made me unsure if this is a trilogy I’ll reread in its entirety again. I still have a special place in my heart for The Darkest Minds, because when I read that it felt so clever and unlike anything else I’d ever read. Never Fade brings in more dystopian tropes, and, well, I’ll be putting up my review of book three in a few days.

So, while I really liked this book, I don’t feel like I absolutely need this book.