3 stars · reread review · young adult

Reread Review: Every Day by David Levithan

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every day

author : david levithan

pages : [hardcover] 322

memorable quote :

I wake up thinking of yesterday. The joy is in remembering; the pain is in knowing it was yesterday.

summary :

I wake up.

Immediately, I have to figure out who I am. It’s not just the body – opening my eyes and discovering whether the skin on my arm is light or dark, whether my hair is long or short, whether I’m fat or thin, boy or girl, scarred or smooth. The body is the easiest thing to adjust to, if you’re used to waking up in a new one each morning. It’s the life, the context of the body, that can be hard to grasp.

Every day I am someone else. I am myself – I know I am myself – but I am also someone else.

It has always been like this.

original rating, december 2012 : 5 stars

december 2017 rating : 3 stars

I remember the love that I had for this book. I remember being unable to put it down, until to get this remarkable concept out of my head.

I have fallen out of love with this book.

I still love the premise. The concept is the driving force of this book and David Levithan does a fantastic job with it. The diversity presented within this book is astounding.

It just isn’t a very good love story.

I realize that it needs to be insta-love; A only spends one day in each body so in order for them to form a connection with anyone it needs to be a little instantaneous. But it was also slightly . . . weird. As in, A kept pressuring the love interest to be with them and kiss them and all when she’d repeatedly said she has no interest in them and has a boyfriend.

It made things jarring and less fun and less . . . good.

I still think everyone should give this book a try, if only for the intriguing concept and the diversity spread throughout. It’s worthwhile. It’s just no longer a favorite, and I’m not sure I’ll ever read it again.

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5 stars · nonfiction

The Art of How to Train Your Dragon is AMAZING

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the art of how to train your dragon

written by : tracey miller-zarneke

preface by : cressida cowell

pages [hardcover] 160

favorite part of the book : toothless concept art!

summary :

Featuring more than 350 pieces of development artwork that includes early character designs, story sketches, and concept paintings never before released by the studio, The Art of How to Train Your Dragon offers a stunning view of DreamWorks Animation’s film about an unlikely alliance between a young Viking and a deadly dragon, inspired by the original book by Cressida Cowell.

The Art of How to Train Your Dragon presents the insights of the filmmakers who crafted this high-flying cinematic adventure and takes the audience on a visual tour of the Viking and dragon worlds that is an enthralling – but far less treacherous – as one would experience living among fire-breathing creatures with a boisterous Viking tribe.

The reader will be intrigued by page after page of beautifully realized illustrations that show how this remarkable movie about the Viking world, “where only the strong can belong,” mixed with the dragon world with its “fiery furies,” was conceived in its full glory. There are also behind-the-scenes section on the bold cinematic techniques used in creating this strikingly original animated movie. With an exclusive preface by Cressida Crowell and forward by Craig Ferguson, How to Train Your Dragon will be a delight for all movie and animation lovers as well as dragon and Viking fans.

review :

I absolutely love the art books that accompany most animated movies nowadays. They’re pretty expensive so I don’t own nearly as many as I’d like but whenever the stars align, and the pay is good, and the price is right, one falls into my hands. I’ve been waiting on this one for a while. It didn’t disappoint.

The Art of How to Train Your Dragon is slightly reminiscent of The Art of Rise of the Guardians, because each had a children’s/middle grade book series that existed before the film was conceived. And both films aren’t so much direct adaptations as vaguely related entities when compared to the original texts. I loved being able to see the steps that occurred between the original conception of the movie, focused more on the book, and the end result, which told its own story. Using the same basics characters, setting, and themes, but in a slightly aged-up and slightly scarier version of Hiccup’s world.

I loved it all.

I loved seeing concept art–concept art always fascinates me. To see these iterations of beloved characters and know that they could have looked like any one of those options if the design team had taken the film in a different direction. I loved the little fun facts, like Astrid’s braid trailing down her back rather than the side of her head because she kept turning and whacking other characters with it. I loved learning how they layered the settings, cheated with the lighting, threw in details they knew might not make it to the final version.

I can’t pretend to know everything about animation. I’m not an artist. But I know story. And it’s so interesting to see how all of these different components and concepts and ideas thread together into a cohesive and loved whole. Something people will watch and remember and then watch again.

I can’t recommend this book enough! It’s smart, it’s beautiful, and most importantly, it has dragons.

5/5 stars

 

5 stars · Fantasy · series

A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab is all I want in fantasy

A Darker Shade final for Irene

a darker shade of magic

shades of magic #1

author : v.e. schwab

pages : [hardcover] 400

memorable quote :

“I’m not going to die,” she said. “Not till I’ve seen it.”
“Seen what?”
Her smile widened. “Everything.”

favorite character : holland

summary :

Kell is one of the last Antari—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel Londons; Red, Grey, White, and, once upon a time, Black.

Kell was raised in Arnes—Red London—and officially serves the Maresh Empire as an ambassador, traveling between the frequent bloody regime changes in White London and the court of George III in the dullest of Londons, the one without any magic left to see.

Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see. It’s a defiant hobby with dangerous consequences, which Kell is now seeing firsthand.

After an exchange goes awry, Kell escapes to Grey London and runs into Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She first robs him, then saves him from a deadly enemy, and finally forces Kell to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure.

Now perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, they’ll first need to stay alive.

review :

This book is truly a rollercoaster and, wow, I can’t believe I waited so long to read it.

There are some books I know I’ve been hyped too much about and can’t enjoy. Then there are some that live up to the hype, exceed it–maybe deserve more of it. A Darker Shade of Magic is certainly the latter.

And, yes, I’d heard a lot of good things about this book. But I dove into it without even reading the summary–without knowing much about the plot really. Apart from assuming it had something to do with magic. (Yes. There is plenty of magic in this book. What. A. Shock.) I loved not knowing what I was getting myself into. What the world was, what the plot was going to be, what the characters goals and motivations were. I wanted to find out within the story and it truly delivered.

This is the first book I’ve read by this author and I already know I need more to devour. The writing is just captivating. I love the way that the world was built. And there was absolutely no info-dumping! I hate that more than almost anything else in fantasy novels. The characters were so nicely fleshed out that you came to feel for even the most minor of them. I wanted more of some who only appeared on a few pages!

That said, some of the main characters were a little predictable in their little heroic roles. I’m excited because the way this book left off leaves more room for interesting and unexpected things to happen. For these characters to really branch out and flex their wills and abilities in this world.

Basically I need book two like yesterday.

This is a book I’ll recommend and reread. It’s a book with characters I love and a world I can immerse myself in and a story that hooks me in. I can’t wait to see what happens next!

5/5 stars

 

3 stars · series · young adult

Daughter of the Pirate King: entertaining but disappointing

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daughter of the pirate king

daughter of the pirate king #1

author : tricia levenseller

pages : [hardcover] 320

favorite character : alosa

summary :

There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.

Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.

More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King.

review :

Daughter of the Pirate King was a lot of fun and proved why we need more lady pirates in books. But it wasn’t perfect.

I’ve wanted to read this book ever since I saw the MC compared to a ‘female Jack Sparrow’ (and my love for the Pirates of the Caribbean films is never-ending despite theirfaults). The cover is cool, the concept cooler. I finally managed to get a copy from the library and settled in.

The book immediately draws you in. The plot begins with a big battle scene, the beginnings of a cunning scheme, and blood. Lots of blood. Oh, and death. This isn’t some sanitized version of pirating–there are lots of people who aren’t going to make it through the book, simply because they were in the wrong place, or didn’t fight hard enough, or were too drunk to defend themselves. I loved that ‘classic’ pirate things were happening–the pillaging, the plundering, the drinking. All seen through the lens of this incredibly strange and powerful young woman.

Alosa is an amazing main character in many ways. She’s interesting to follow. She’s smart, has witty comebacks, and is a fantastic fighter. The only problem is possibly that she’s too good. She’s too perfect at getting herself out of sticky situations; too perfect at being better than everyone else. Even when she’s defeated she is only losing because she allows the other person to think of her as weaker. This wasn’t merely something like she has the ego to think she’s the best. There’s nothing here to show she isn’t the best.

And, with that comparison to Jack Sparrow–we all know even the best pirates need someone else to save their skin sometimes.

The writing I think is what kept me from giving this book any higher than three stars. While I know that it’s just due to my taste, I couldn’t dive into the style. The tone didn’t feel right to me. For all of the reasons I loved the way this book was going, that couldn’t persuade me to fall in love with the writing. Which is . . . pretty much a big one for me when I judge books.

I think this is going to be a series; I can almost guarantee that I won’t read the sequel. Which disappoints me so muchbecause, like I said, I love some badass women pirates. I love these types of characters. I just wish this had been written differently.

3/5 stars

 

 

 

5 stars · books to movies

Thor Ragnarok: Movie Review

This was my least anticipated Marvel title for a while now. I never really expected to actually see it in theaters.

I’m so glad that I did.

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Thor: Ragnarok follows a more Guardians of the Galaxy kind of tone when it comes to superhero films. It doesn’t take itself too seriously–actually, it doesn’t take the previous two Thor films too seriously. It pokes fun at itself, while simultaneously building on the mythology of the world and the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It was fun, and sad, and had a lot of amazing fight scenes complete with superpowers and explosions.

Basically, all I want in my Avengers films these days.

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Thor has always been my least favorite Avenger–maybe tied with the Hulk. And because both of those Avengers happen to be in this movie, I never really gave it much thought. The previous two Thor movies never really stood out to me. They were dark and serious, without the hearty punch that’s come from previous Marvel movies with the same tone. Which is crazy to me because undoubtedly out of the favorite characters of the MCU is Loki. The previous Thor movies didn’t have the charm and heart of the Captain America films. None of the punchy pizzazz that comes with Iron Man. Those two series succeed in having rather dark and twisted plots, amazing characters to pull them through, and memorable witty moments.

Thor didn’t really succeed with the funny for me until this movie.

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I will admit that Ragnarok did at times feel like it was trying too hard. That it wanted so much to be seen as something separate, so it could be more successful, that it was punching its way out of the setup given by the previous movies. What happened to Thor’s friends? I could only remember Lady Sif. Where did all of his friends go? Thor really doesn’t seem to care. He cares a whole lot for saving the world (well, stopping the start of the end of the world, I guess) but it’s a lot of generic for the greater good and not the good of, you know . . . all those guys he spent thousands of years fighting beside.

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The character of Thor himself was decidedly different. Of course he would have changed, what with the ‘stuff’ he’s been through (I have to be vague–I literally have no idea what he’s been up to and he gives the vaguest answer, too, okay?) and the whole Jane situation (does anyone else remember when Thor used to date Natalie Portman?). There were just a few random moments where Thor seemed very un-Thor like for the sake of throwing in a few extra jokes.

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BUT I will say that those are the only bad things I can say about this film. As soon as I finished watching it, I decided I wanted to watch it again. I loved the amazing settings, the new characters introduced, the dynamic between Thor and Loki (I MISSED THIS SO MUCH). I want more. Am I a Thor fan now? I guess. Am I even more excited for the next Avengers movie? I didn’t think it was possible, but YES.

Have you seen Thor: Ragnarok? What did you think? Most importantly: What was your favorite joke?

I give Thor a resounding 5/5 stars because the entertainment of it outweighed anything else.

 

 

 

 

5 stars · science fiction · series

Undivided by Neal Shusterman; an amazing conclusion to the series

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undivided

unwind #4

book 1: unwind
book 2: unwholly
book 3: unsouled

author : neal shusterman

pages : [hardcover] 372

favorite characters  conner & risa

memorable quote :

Best way to save humanity is to turn the monsters against one another.

summary :

Teens control the fate of America in the fourth and final book in the New York Times bestselling Unwind dystology by Neal Shusterman.

Proactive Citizenry, the company that created Cam from the parts of unwound teens, has a plan: to mass produce rewound teens like Cam for military purposes. And below the surface of that horror lies another shocking level of intrigue: Proactive Citizenry has been suppressing technology that could make unwinding completely unnecessary. As Conner, Risa, and Lev uncover these startling secrets, enraged teens begin to march on Washington to demand justice and a better future.

But more trouble is brewing. Starkey’s group of storked teens is growing more powerful and militant with each new recruit. And if they have their way, they’ll burn the harvest camps to the ground and put every adult in them before a firing squad—which could destroy any chance America has for a peaceful future.

review :

Unwind was one of those books that, after I read it, I knew immediately I was going to love it and keep rereading it forever. It took me a little while to realize it was going to be part of a series. I’m so amazed at the turns this series has taken–the ups, the downs, those nail-biting moments in-between. Neal Shusterman proves again and again that he’s one of my favorite authors because he’s brilliant, and writes wholly (ha) unique and compelling narratives, and creates these characters you can’t help but love.

Undivided, the final book in the Unwind dystology, came with a bittersweet feeling. I often hate to end series because, while I have this pull to know what’s going to happen, I can’t help but feel like I need to stretch out my time in the story. I don’t want it to end. Oftentimes it takes me longest to read the books I know I’ll love because I’m afraid of the terrible things that could happen to the wonderful characters.

Not to say that Neal Shusterman isn’t also capable of creating amazing, compelling villains, or those characters who float around in the gray area between good and evil. As much as I care for some of the amazing crew they’ve picked up along the way, I always need me some Connor and Risa.

I won’t spoil anything. I will say that this book made me cry like I haven’t since I read book one for the first time. It’s amazingly thoughtful, terribly reminiscent and poignant in today’s world. It’s sweet. It bites. And it’s everything that I could have ever wished for.

What I love most about this series is that when it’s bad, you can’t imagine it will get any worse. And it does. And then when it’s good, you can’t imagine it’ll get any better, and then it does. There’s never any way to predict it and I wouldn’t have it any other way. I’m sad to say goodbye to those surprises, and these characters, and those moments that made me laugh or cry. But I’m glad for the journey–if only so I can force everyone I know to read these books, immediately.

Undivided proves, once and for all, that this will be one of my favorite series of all time.

5/5 stars

5 stars · Fantasy · fiction

Teen Titans Volume 1: an interesting reboot series

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Teen Titans: Volume 1

Damian Knows Best

author : benjamin percy

illustrator : jonboy meyers

pages : [paperback] 144

summary :

As a part of DC Universe: Rebirth, the son of Batman, Damian Wayne, joins the Teen Titans!

The Teen Titans are further apart than ever before…until Damian Wayne recruits Starfire, Raven, Beast Boy and the new Kid Flash to join him in a fight against his own grandfather, Ra’s al Ghul! But true leadership is more than just calling the shots–is Robin really up to the task? Or will the Teen Titans dismiss this diminutive dictator?

The team will have to figure this out fast, as a great evil from Damian’s past is lurking around the corner, ready to strike at the team’s newest leader and destroy the new Teen Titans before they even begin!

The newest era of one of DC’s greatest super-teams begins here in Teen Titans, Volume 1: Damian Knows Best! Written by Benjamin Percy (Green Arrow) with spectacular art by newcomer Jonboy Meyers.

CollectingTeen Titans 1-5, Rebirth

review :

I love Teen Titans. I love the DC Rebirth event. I love this volume.

Damian Knows Best kicks off with a nice kidnapping of all of the team members and only gets better and more complex from there. Starfire, Raven, Beast Boy, and Kid Flash are all older (though not necessarily more mature) than thirteen year old Damian. He knows what he wants, and maybe not necessarily what he needs. With a team put together, he’s determined to keep all of them alive–knowing that big enemies are coming toward them, both because of and in spite of them.

I loved the character arc throughout this volume for Damian, aka Robin, aka the son of Batman. He really grew on me, from this obnoxious, egotistical little kid to a strong, brave (still really short) kid. He’s put up with so much in life. I love how glimpses into his upbringing are given without the typical info-dumping that typically happens in comics. Instead, it’s introduced gradually and seamlessly into the plot.

Apart from that, I love how every version of Teen Titans I read involves its own take of the team members. Not only stylistically with the character sketches but little tweaks with how they hold themselves, present themselves, though the core of their personalities and who they are always remains the same.

This volume also has amazing, complex, and a little bit terrifying villains. I love how nothing was simple. I loved the big battles. I love that the Titans aren’t all-powerful and still have a few things to work out between themselves to become an even greater team.

I’d definitely recommend this volume, both to fans of the Titans and those who’d never been introduced to them at all. This is one you can read with no background info and absolutely fall into. The universe and plot set themselves up so nicely, the art is amazing, and the characters are addictive. I need more!

5/5 stars