2 stars · fiction · young adult

Stork by Wendy Delsol

 

Stork

Stork #1

author : wendy delsol

pages : [hardcover] 355

summary :

Family secrets. Lost memories. And the arrival of an ancient magical ability that will reveal everything.

Sixteen-year-old Katla LeBlanc has just moved from Los Angeles to Minnesota. As if it weren’t enough that her trendy fashion sense draws stares, Katla soon finds out that she’s a Stork, a member of a mysterious order of women tasked with a very unique duty. But Katla’s biggest challenge may be finding her flock at a new school. Between being ignored by Wade, the arrogant jock she stupidly fooled around with, and constantly arguing with gorgeous farm boy and editor-in-chief Jack, Katla is relieved when her assignment as the school paper’s fashion columnist brings with it some much-needed friendship. But as Homecoming approaches, Katla uncovers a shocking secret about her past — a secret that binds her fate to Jack’s in a way neither could have ever anticipated. With a nod to Hans Christian Andersen and inspired by Norse lore, Wendy Delsol’s debut novel introduces a hip and witty heroine who finds herself tail-feathers deep in small-town life.

review :

The book is unlike any other that I’ve read. That’s what I liked about it from the beginning: The unique concept. Unfortunately, I feel like not much was done with that idea throughout the entire book and then too much was attempted at the conclusion. While I realize that this is a trilogy and more to come will probably explain things that happened at the end of Stork, the sudden escalation and addition of plot points that had never even been hinted toward severely disappointed me.

Katla was an interesting main character. While she has some typical YA traits-she’s new in town, a little quirky-she also likes to drop name brands and give people makeovers. While I have absolutely no problem with her enjoying fashion, I never really like books that have to give a whole brand-name description of what every character who enters the scene is wearing, in every scene of the novel. Also, I didn’t really appreciate her looking down on people who wore clothes that were kind of normal, just because they weren’t designer.

Katla’s ‘unique duty’ that comes with being a member of the Storks took a while to develop, even though some of the steps were predictable and I was simply reading on waiting for Katla to realize what I as the reader already knew. This wasn’t done in a suspenseful or humorous manner, either; I don’t think it was intended to be predictable to me.

Things between Jack and Katla were very strained and nearly nonexistent for most of the book until the conclusion, where everything escalated too quickly. Then there was nothing that I could enjoy about their relationship. It seemed too forced and sudden; by that point of the novel, I’d noticed too many faults to truly enjoy myself.

Stork spends most of its pages following Katla in her typical life while not much happens to her. Then, it seems, the plot seemed to realize it was dragging on, so it thrust forward a villain that hadn’t even been a villain throughout the entire book until the end. One who was so cornily cliche in the evil speech/telling Katla his entire plan/suddenly trying to kill people. And then the climax had things happening that were so ridiculous, I would have laughed if I hadn’t been so sad that a good premise had turned out to be like this.

I’m not sure if other people would enjoy this book but I wouldn’t recommend it. I give it two stars because I did like the connection to Norse lore, in the beginning.

2/5 stars

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