favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Jess from Bookworms in Dresses!

favorite book friday

Hey guys! It’s Friday again, and you know what that means: another favorite book from another blogger! Here’s Jess from Bookworms in Dresses! Check out her blog as well and send her some love! 🙂

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I feel like every time I was introduced to someone and told them I was a bookworm, the first question I was asked was: “Have you read House of Leaves? It’s, like, my all time favorite book ever!” Needless to say, maybe it was jut because I tended to hang out with all the “Indie music loving alternative hipsters”, but I kept hearing about the book all the time, yet I had never read it! Everyone offered to lend me a copy, but I love having books on my shelves, so instead I bought my own copy. It was finally time for me to tackle this book that I had somehow missed for so long.

After finishing the book, I can safely say that it is in my top 5. House of Leaves is experimental, complicated, strange, haunting, and harrowing. The book utilizes so many different elements to tell the story: Different fonts, colors, footnotes, images, and even more strange things. Although, that’s only part of what makes the story so gripping when you read it.

House of Leaves is about two stories. One: A boy who finds a chest in his neighbor’s apartment containing an old manuscript, who is reading through said manuscript. Two: The manuscript itself, which is telling the story of a photographer who finds something is very, very wrong with his house.

Reading this, it makes you feel like you are spiraling down into madness along with the characters. Something about this book just feels so personal and real, even though the book clearly states that the story is pure fiction on the inside cover. It’s a haunting story that you just can’t stop reading once you start. You are turning the book all around in your hands, reading things upside down or sentences that spiral off the page. If you are a stickler for the classic writing style, this book will probably leave you irritated right off the bat, but if you can get past that, it’s easy to get wrapped up in the words.

I found myself wanting to measure all the walls in my house when I finished reading it and looking around at all my surroundings to make sure nothing was changed. The paranoia followed me right out of the pages. In that way, how haunting the book is and how the story clings to you, is what made me love it. I love books that can draw me in that deeply and make me look around at things around me in a different light.

If a book has ever moved you like that, I’d love to hear about it! I love books that can impact you so deeply while you read them! Now I’m that indie music loving alternative hipster that tells everyone that they should read House of Leaves when I meet them. It’s funny how the tables have turned. Now it’s off to measure the walls again, to make sure everything is the same as it was yesterday… (just kidding!)

Bio: Hello there! I’m so excited to be guest posting on this book filled blog! I blog over at Bookworms in Dresses, where I review books, talk about life as a post grad, and share some outfit posts from time to time as well! I come from the city of Pittsburgh, where I attended college, and now live with my boyfriend who is the definition of an Indie-Music-Loving-Alternative-Hipster (with a great beard). I’ve been a bookworm since I could read, and I always got in trouble for reading books under my desk at school, as well as under the table at dinner. Getting me to put a book down is a struggle. I hope you enjoyed my review of House of Leaves!

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Thanks Jess! I’ve heard really great things about this book and now I know I definitely need to read it!  Maybe over the summer! Thanks for the post!

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Valerie from Indecisively Restless

favorite book friday

Hey everyone! Another week has come, and another Friday! This one brings you Valerie, who blogs over at Indecisively Restless! This recommendation in particular is one that I’m VERY excited to share because I love this series, too! It’s one that I started reading a long, long time ago and need to read again. It’s great!

But don’t take my word for it–take hers!

Without further ado, here’s Valerie!

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Hi Caught Between the Pages readers! I’m Valerie from Indecisively Restless. Books have always been a huge part of my life so I’m more than excited to be here today talking about one of my favorites:

Sloppy Firsts by Megan McCafferty.

Sloppy Firsts is the first in a five-part series about Jessica Darling. Jessica is a junior in high school when her best friend Hope moves away. Since then Jessica has become an insomniac. Hoping that journaling will lull her to sleep, Jessica recounts her worries, pains, and hilarious observations that occur throughout the day. We’re privy to the most inner workings of her mind. From her annoyance to the girls she’s forced to hang out with now that Hope is gone; to the mysterious Marcus Flutie, the school’s bad-boy druggie who seems to keep popping up everywhere. With each day a hardship to get through, will she be able to find someone else to fill the space Hope left?

I love this book because I was Jessica. I didn’t fit in, I had a best friend who didn’t go the same school, and I had a hard time making new friends. But the cringe-worthy moments within the book remind me that everyone feels awkward every once in a while and it’s all about how you deal with it. It’s a great book to laugh and reminisce on all the things that felt so huge and life altering when you were going through them the first time. Things like boyfriends, best friends, best-friends-turned-boyfriends, parental expectations, and your own grandiose ideas of the person you’re meant to be.

McCafferty captures Jessica’s personality perfectly. She’s smart, complicated, witty, snarky, and always trying to figure out who she is. She’s so real that I wish we could be friends. I’m sure that if you’ve ever experienced awkward teenage angst, you’ll love this book. And if you haven’t, consider yourself lucky.

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Thanks so much Valerie! Everyone go check out her blog and say hello to her! 🙂

If you’d like to join in on Favorite Book Fridays, email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail.com!

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Tayler from The Morrell Tale

favorite book friday

Hi everyone! It’s Friday, and today Tayler is here to talk about her favorite book! I’m really excited for you all to read what she has to say. If you have a chance, check out her blog, too, and give her a few comments!

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Hey, y’all! I’m Tayler and I blog at The Morrell Tale. I blog about motherhood, teaching Junior High English and History, recipes I make, books I read, and anything else that I think about.

I love to read–always have, always will. I’ve been reading since before entering Kindergarten, and I’ll be reading to the day I die. I read because it allows me to escape and travel. I can live a thousand lives, travel to hundreds of worlds and times, experience new adventures I’d never be able to in real life. And the crafting of novels! I once fell in love with a boy because I was in love with his writing.

My favorite book is actually a trilogy. And, it was definitely hard to choose this above my other favorite series, Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson. But, this trilogy beat them because of the outstanding art of the written word.

Inkheart!

I actually love all of Cornelia Funke’s works, but Inkeart is a step above the rest. Funke even said, “I think it is my best writing so far, and all of my passions for books is in there.”

Inkheart is about Meggie, whose father has been called Silvertongue because he has the gift to “read” characters out of a story. He accidentally read some villains (and a loveable fire juggler) out of a story called Inkeart. They want to get back, so they try to use his gifts for their own evil purposes. (How’s that for a short synopsis that doesn’t give anything away?)

But, what I love about it, it is a meta-book: a book about books and writing. It is so beautiful. Each chapter also begins with a quote from another great piece of literature that applies to the events of that chapter. I looked forward to those, and was excited to see if it was from a poem or story I had read.

Funke even explained why she wrote the novel: “Every reader knows about the feeling that characters in books seem more real than real people. So I was surprised to hear that there were no stories about people coming out of books.” I know I have always dreamed of stepping into novels, and here, I had found one with characters stepping out! And then, when I read the sequel, Inkspell, Meggie discovers she has the same gift and is able to “read” people into novels–and does so with her group into Inkheart! Then, in the finale, Inkdeath, they are still in the novel. How I wish I could be with Meggie, enjoying her gift and not just seeing the adventures in my imagination as I read, but to actually, truly experience them!

If you could “read” a character out of a book, or yourself in a book, who or what would it be?
 
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Inkheart! One of those books I feel is severely underrated and needs to be read by all! I absolutely loved these books when I was younger. I can’t remember if I ever finished the trilogy . . so that just means I’m going to need to pick them up and enjoy them again!
Thanks so much for sharing, Tayler–and reminding me that I need to reread this trilogy!
If anyone else would like to join in on Favorite Book Fridays, email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail.com!
favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Vicky from The Outpat Expat

favorite book friday

Hello everyone! Today I’m super excited to share another favorite book with you–this one comes from Vicky! Her blog, The Outback Expat, is definitely worth a visit! Check out her review and comment below to welcome her to the blog!

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I haven’t really written book reviews before, I’ve commented on a couple of books I have liked on Goodreads but that is about all so far.

It’s not news that I love to read and I often ask and am asked for book ideas from a couple of my close friends when we can’t decide what to read.

I chose to write this review of The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult.

Synopsis
Sage Singer is a young woman who has been damaged by her past. Her solitary night work as a baker allows her to hide from the world and focus her creative energies on the beautiful bread she bakes.

Yet she finds herself striking up an unlikely friendship. Josef Weber is a quiet, grandfatherly man, well respected in the community; everyone’s favourite retired teacher and Little League coach.

One day he asks Sage for a favour: to kill him. Shocked, Sage refuses.
Then Josef tells her that he deserves to die – and why.

What do you do when evil lives next door? Can someone who’s committed horrendous acts ever truly redeem themselves? Is forgiveness yours to offer if you aren’t the person who was wronged? And most of all – if Sage even considers his request – would it be murder, or justice?

My Review
I have enjoyed Jodi Picoult’s books for years and read quite a few of them. I hadn’t read any for a while though so decided it was time to give them a go again. I found I had already downloaded The Storyteller onto my Kindle app on the iPad so it seemed like the perfect choice.

Without giving anything away, the theme of this book is heavy going and at times I wondered whether I could continue reading it because it was harrowing but whilst this is not a true story (as far as I know) these events or similar events really took place.

This book just blew me away to be honest and has stayed with me still several days after I finished reading it. I find myself stopping and thinking about the characters and what happened to them during and after the book ended because it really feels like you lived the story with them. It was definitely one of those stories where you desperately want to know what happens but don’t because then the beautifully written story would end.

I would definitely recommend this book to my friends and gave it 5 stars on my Goodreads rating. You can also read an excerpt of the book here.

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Thanks for the review Vicky! I’ve only read a few Jody Picoult books and have been meaning to read more by her. This is going to the top of my list!

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If you’d like to participate in Favorite Book Fridays, email me @ caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail.com!

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Corinne from The Feminist Feline

favorite book friday

Hello everyone! Happy Friday! Today I’m really excited to have Corinne on the blog because she’ll be talking about a book that I really love, Pride and Prejudice! Let’s all give her a warm welcome!

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Why We All Need to Re-Read Pride and Prejudice Right Now
 
Pride and Prejudice. We all read it in high school. Whether or not you liked the book then, I’m sure we can all agree that the 2005 movie adaptation starringKeiraKnightley was fabulous, and that the 1995 mini-series starring Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy is a classic.

Every other year, a new adaptation of Pride and Prejudice is made. There’s “Bridget Jone’s Diary,” there’s a Bollywood version called “Bride and Prejudice,” and there was even a YouTube series called The Lizzie Bennet Diaries that was released in 2012.
But can you remember the last time you actually read Pride and Prejudice?
I for one can. Pride and Prejudice is the only book longer that Green Eggs and Ham that I have read more than once. I always have new books that I want to read, so I never re-read books, except for P&P of course. There’s something about this classic that never gets me bored. Is it the lovable characters? The simple plot? The happy ending? As much as I love all those elements of the story, what keeps me coming back is its feminist message.
I first read Pride and Prejudice when I was a senior in high school for my AP Literature class. I had seen the Keira Knightley movie a few years prior and had seen snippets of the Colin Firth mini-series because my mom would watch it all the time. But actually reading it for the first time changed my life. I know it sounds cliche, but reading Pride and Prejudice could not have come at a more perfect time in my life. It was December of my senior year and I was knee-deep in the horrible college application process. The process was very difficult for me, and I couldn’t handle the stress. I couldn’t sleep, I constantly had anxiety attacks, and I was barely eating. Pride and Prejudice was my escape from all the stress – and the best part was that it was schoolwork! Reading Pride and Prejudice helped me get closer with with my mom (who calls it her favorite book as well) and both the book and my mother helped me get well and be happy again.
After reading the book, I had to write a paper on it for my class. We had a few topics to choose from, and I chose to discuss the feminist elements of the novel. Elizabeth Bennett is a true feminist. She refuses to marry on the grounds of financial security alone and is steadfast in only marrying if she truly loves the person. If that means she might become a spinster, then so be it. Elizabeth values her independence and family far more than any guy, and she refuses to succumb to society’s expectations for her as a woman. After writing my paper, I became more interested in feminism, which led me to create my blog The Feminist Feline, where I discuss news, politics and culture from a feminist perspective.
Pride and Prejudice helped me to get through a difficult time in my life and led me to who I am today as an independent feminist who’s not afraid to speak up for what I believe is right. What has Pride and Prejudice done for you?
Once my finals are done this semester, I will go home for Christmas and do what I do every year: re-read Pride and Prejudice. The book always helps me to balance my life, which is essential for me to ring in the new year. If you have yet to read Pride and Prejudice, I hope that this post encourages you to do so. And if you only read it once or have read it a million times like I have, I hope that you feel encouraged to re-read it (again). It’s not just a literary classic. It’s a treasure.
Bio
Corinne Falotico will be graduating from The George Washington University with a major in Political Communication in one month. In addition to blogging at The Feminist Feline, she is a staff writer at The Rival DC, a freelance writer at HauteMess Magazine, and a social media intern at The Indie Chicks. Her favorite journalist is Elizabeth Plank and she has a huge lady boner for Rachel Maddow. Her hobbies include watching every movie and TV adaptation of a Jane Austen novel ever made, blasting Green Day and pretending that her roommate’s cats are her own. Be sure to follow her on TwitterFacebookInstagramPinterestGoogle+Tumblr, and Bloglovin’.
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Thanks so much Corinne! I loved Pride and Prejudice when I read it in high school. I wasn’t exactly assigned it but I selected it to be the one I’d write my research paper on and I’m so glad that I did! I’m fairly sure that I wrote my paper from a feminist perspective, too! I absolutely love rereading books so maybe this’ll be one of the ones I get to over winter break!
If anyone else would be interested in getting featured on Favorite Book Friday, just shoot me an email at caughtbetweenthepageblog at gmail dot com. You won’t regret it! 😉
favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: RaeAnne from So Many Hobbies, So Little Time!

favorite book friday

Hello everyone! We’re back to Friday again and this week we have a special blogger posting! I’ve known her online for a few years from the roleplays we write together and I recently had the chance to check out her amazing blog! Please give a warm welcome to RaeAnne!

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Hiya!

I am so honored to be writing a guest post for the wonderful Kayla and her amazing blog!!  Like…wow!  But before I get too ahead of myself, I suppose an introduction is in order.  My name is RaeAnne and I have recently turned seventeen, I’ve been reading and writing for as long as I can remember, and my favorite food is chocolate…unless it’s pizza  That’s all you need to know, right?  🙂  Okay, yeah, I’ll talk about my blog for a minute, too.
My blog has the title So Many Hobbies, So Little Time, which is sadly true.  But it doesn’t keep me from having a million and five different hobbies.  My posts are about anything and everything; television shows, my life in general, music, books, food, writing things, tutorials…whatever strikes my fancy at the time.  🙂  My favorite thing to write about, however, is books; I used to post my “Confessions of a Bibliophile” on a weekly basis, but once I got out of the habit of posting, that habit went out the window.  Soon, though, I hope to be returning to that!

 

When I was asked to write this post, I was excited and got a big smile on my face.  And then I started to wonder how the heck I was supposed to come up with a favorite book.  I can’t even think of a favorite food!  This might be impossible, y’all.  Or about as close as something can get to impossible.
I’ve narrowed it down to a few and as I write this I’m trying to choose which one to write about!  *Deep breath and heavy sigh.*  Okay.  I’ve got it.  Let me preface this with an interesting fact about myself:  I really like the Classics.  I chose to read The Count of Monte Cristo!  And A Tale of Two CitiesLes Misérables had me in tears the entire way through, but it’s so good!
I think a number of things go into this.  For one, the authors actually cared about their characters, and I think that’s hard to come by nowadays.  I can get past the random things that have seemingly nothing to do with the rest of the story; if I got paid by the word (as they did back then) I’d be doing the same exact thing!  And something about the way that they’re written, the words that they use and the ways they use them, are just so eloquent.  Sure, I might need to re-read a sentence a half dozen times before I can grasp what’s being said, but that’s fine with me.
But, in case that isn’t what you’d just pick up and read, or like to read about, I’ve decided to write about And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie.  (But if you’d like to read my thoughts on the Classics I’ve read, just find the category on my blog entitled “Confessions of a Bibliophile.”)

This is the novel that can claim that it’s the only book that I have re-read; I usually can’t do this because my list of books to read is always miles and miles long!  But it’s so good that I just can’t help it!
It was originally published under another title, Ten Little Indians.  They changed it so that they wouldn’t be offending anyone, but this is still what I usually call it; I mean, that’s the title of the poem that the book is based on.
Agatha Christie was brilliant.  A bit messed up, but brilliant.  And it makes for a splendid book!
It’s not a very long novel, And Then There Were None, but it has you guessing all the way through—don’t think about skipping the epilogue, either, there’s some important stuff in there!
Ten people from very different walks of life all receive an invitation from someone they can’t quite remember if they know or not, a Mr. Owens.  They’re all very different people, too, and we get to observe this story from each one’s point of view—it’s unique and fantastic; this book couldn’t have been written any other way!
Mr. Owens has invited them to his house, which is on an island.  A bit suspicious, no?  Nevertheless, these people all decide to go and see what this whole thing is about.
Stiff and awkward greetings have been exchanged, and everyone is busy trying to figure out what the others around them are like and what connections they might have to their host.
Upon arriving at the house, there is no Mr. Owens to be found; instead, there’s just the older married couple that serve as butler and maid.
They’re all sitting around after dinner, making small talk and drinking—or frowning upon those that are.  And suddenly, they hear a voice—it’s actually a recording, but none of them know that at the time.  This disembodied voice then accuses each man and woman in that room of a dreadful crime—of murder.  And, of course, if you’ve killed once, what’s to keep you from doing so again?
Everyone is in a panic, denying that they’ve ever done anything wrong and each secretly wondering how this Mr. Owens knows such personal things about them.
In the middle of the pandemonium, a young man (the preppy guy of the bunch, who has been accused of killing kids while driving somewhat drunk, or at least driving quicker than he should have been) begins to choke…and he drops dead before anyone can do a thing about it.  This does nothing to help the mood, as you can imagine.  Who had done it, and how?  He’d been drinking, was it poison?

They want to leave.  They all want to get out of there and get back to their normal lives, forgetting about what had happened.  But they can’t!  It’s storming dreadfully outside and it will be days before a boat could get to them.

As they go their separate ways later that night, one of them finds a familiar nursery rhyme framed in their room.  It goes like this:

Ten little Indian boys went out to dine;

One choked his little self and then there were nine.

Nine little Indian boys sat up very late;

One overslept himself and then there were eight.

Eight little Indian boys traveling in Devon;

One said he’d stay there and then there were seven.

Seven little Indian boys chopping up sticks;

One chopped himself in halves and then there were six.

Six little Indian boys playing with a hive;

A bumblebee stung one and then there were five.

Five little Indian boys going in for law,

One got in Chancery and then there were four.

Four little Indian boys going out to sea;

A red herring swallowed one and then there were three.

Three little Indian boys walking in the Zoo;

A big bear hugged one and then there were two.

Two little Indian boys sitting in the sun;

On got frizzled up and then there was one.

One little Indian boy left all alone;

He went and hanged himself and then there were none.

 

And one of their group had just died…after choking.

You can imagine how this goes!  One by one, people begin mysteriously dying, but in a way that matches up with a child’s nursery rhyme–something I would never tell a child.  It’s a bit disturbing.
Everyone is growing more and more suspicious of each other as time goes on.  They all have their guesses, but are they right?

I’m not going to give it away and I hope that this is enough to make you want to read this masterpiece of a novel.  🙂

Thank you again, Kayla, for letting me do this!  🙂

~*~RaeAnne

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I don’t know about anyone else, but that really makes me want to pick up the book!

Thanks so much RaeAnne for participating! I loved seeing what you had to say.

If anyone else is interested in contributing to Favorite Book Fridays, you can email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail dot com.

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Emily from Emily’s Life Lessons!

favorite book friday
Hey everyone! It’s Friday again, which not only means the weekend but a lovely post by a wonderful blogger! Today Emily is on the blog to talk about a few of her top books. Let’s all give her a warm welcome!
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About Emily :
I am a college senior learning to be a elementary school teacher. I began my blog in the hopes that other people would be able to learn from some of the same life experiences other college students have. I have two sayings that motivate me in my life: If It’s Meant to Be and Just Breathe.
Guest Post :

Starting from when we were traveling throughout the summer, I went through at least three books and stayed strong. I love to read for fun and I rarely have time for it during the year. It is something I wish I continued doing. Instead of watching TV before bed I am not reading books. The summer was a odd and somewhat convoluted combination of books. They ranged from funny and entertaining to books about teaching experiences and theories of education. These were my top four books I read this summer:

1) “Is Everyone Hanging out Without Me? [and Other Concerns]” by Mindy Kaling

This book was beyond hysterical. I have yet to see The Mindy Project but now I really want to. Her voice is so funny and everything she talks about is spot on. I know I am not the first one to write about how amazing this book is, in fact most of my friends read it months ago. This is one book I loved having with me while we were traveling and I almost missed having it over summer for the main reason being I couldn’t re-read it.

2) “Lucky Us” by Amy Bloom

When I got back from my trip I unpacked the box that Her Campus Nationals had sent me. As a campus correspondent, I was fortunate enough to get the shipment of the rewards for reaching a platinum level chapter. There was a ton of cool stuff in there but this book was the best one in my opinion. It was an early release copy and I think I’ll save the full book review for our chapter’s page come in a few weeks but I wanted to rave about it. The premise behind the book isn’t exactly new and the struggles the sisters go through sounds kind of like a movie but you fall in love with the characters. In my opinion a good book is a book that makes you feel bad for the hero and want the villain to get their just desserts. In this sense, the book was a success. I did enjoy the book and it’s a great, easy pool-side or beach read.

3) “I’d Like to Apologize to Every Teacher I Ever Had” by Tony Danza

I LOVED this book. Even for those non-teachers this book is extremely engaging. We all definitely had those teachers we felt bad for when we found out it was their first year and teachers who made a difference in our lives. His recollection of his experience as a first year teacher is amazing. As a future teacher I got so much insight into how to make your first year easier and laughed as some of the stories he tells. After reading I wish I had him as a teacher!

4) “Real Education: Four Simple Truths for Bringing America’s Schools Back to Reality” by Charles Murray

This book was very philosophical and technical so I don’t know if I would suggest it as an easy summer read for someone who isn’t so in the know about education. However, if you are interested in learning briefly about what is wrong with the school’s nowadays, this is a great book to read. Murray is very clear about how he feels and explains potentially confusing terminology. I have taken an interest into reading books on this subject. As a future teacher I feel the need to be in the know of what other people say is wrong with the school systems and how they believe teachers should help fix these problems. I have many more books along these lines but this read was a great introduction for me!

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Thanks Emily! I’ve yet to read any of these books but they sound so interesting and very different from each other. I’ll really have to check them out.

Interested in writing a post about your favorite books? Email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail dot com!

Want to read about more books to add to your to be read pile? Check out the other bloggers who’ve participated in FBF:

~Tiffany from Commoner Couture

~Alaska from Alaska Renee

~Leah from Leah of the Pack

~ Vanessa from A City Girl’s Guide to Life

~Erika from Bearika Rose

~Frances from Wanderlust Notes

~Chloe from Wanderlust in the Midwest

~Sophie from A Series of Tomfooleries

~Maddie from Caramel and Salt

~Sarah from A Rose in the City

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Sarah from A Rose in the City

favorite book friday

Hey everyone! Today I’m so excited to share with you a post made by Sarah, blogger at A Rose in the City. She’s so sweet and her blog definitely reflects that, so please stop over there and say hello to her!

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Hi Everyone! I’m so excited to be posting here about one of my favorite books and to join in on Favorite Book Friday! The book I chose is The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan.

sarah1

I’d heard about Marina Keegan, the Yale student who was killed just days after graduating, when her essay, The Opposite of Loneliness was published on Yale Daily News and subsequently went viral on my Facebook newsfeed. I loved the essay she wrote for graduation and I thought it was so poignant and honest for such a young person and it really resonated with me on a deep level. I found out later that she was to have a book published posthumously and I knew immediately that I wanted to read it.

When I saw the book at my local library, I jumped at the wait list and then voraciously read it. The essays and stories inside tell of such a mature young person it’s kind of crazy. I love her style of writing and I only wish there was an opportunity to read more. There was just so much about this book that I was able to relate to and connect with. This book explains in as many words the millennial generation and I thought it was reflective of her life and the lives of millennials. I’d recommend this book to anyone at the start of their career in college since a lot of subject matter is so intriguing and personal for our generation.

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Wow. I’ve never heard of this book and I’m already tempted to pick it up; even though it’s not what I typically read, it looks like something every college-age person (and those who want to understand that age group) should pick up. Thank you, Sarah!

Want to read about more books to add to your to be read pile? Check out the other bloggers who’ve participated in FBF:

~Tiffany from Commoner Couture

~Alaska from Alaska Renee

~Leah from Leah of the Pack

~ Vanessa from A City Girl’s Guide to Life

~Erika from Bearika Rose

~Frances from Wanderlust Notes

~Chloe from Wanderlust in the Midwest

~Sophie from A Series of Tomfooleries

~Maddie from Caramel and Salt

Want to join in the fun? Email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail dot com so you can send in your own favorite book post!

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Maddie from Caramel and Salt

favorite book friday

 

Hey everyone! Today I’m really excited to have Maddie on the blog! You should all take the chance to check out her own blog and say hello to her-she’s so sweet! Check below to see her thoughts on a great book!

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On the Road

Hey! It’s Maddie from Caramel and Salt here to talk about my all time favorite book, On the Road by Jack Kerouac. I’m mostly a lifestyle (food, college life, etc.) blogger, but I absolutely love reading and am part of the A Beautiful Mess monthly book club. And I cannot wait to tell you all about On the Road!

I remember hearing about Jack Kerouac sometime in high school (I think it was sophomore year) and he really piqued my interest. On the Road is his most well-known book, but if you’re interested in him after reading my post, you should definitely check out his other books as well (Big Sur is my second favorite of his books!).

On the Road was originally written as one huge paragraph on Kerouac’s typewriter, and he taped together each piece of paper, making one long scroll in the end. I read the original version of his book, so I read over 300 pages of one paragraph and without all of his raunchier scenes and friends’ real names edited out. I definitely recommend reading On the Road this way, although it might take you a while to finish the book because it’s definitely not easy to power through one huge paragraph!

On the Road is one of the most famous pieces of Beatnik literature and really captures everything about the 1950s and 1960s. Kerouac wrote On the Road as a sort of autobiography of his earlier life when he was hitchhiking around the US. While reading through his account of his travels, you can really imagine how the US was during that time period. Everyone was so free and the Beat movement really kicked off, introducing sexual freedom, amazing literature and poetry, and most hardcore drugs. This is definitely a racy book and not for the faint of heart, but I really love Kerouac’s writing and how his love for this time period and just his general love of the freedom he experienced shines through. He mostly writes in stream of consciousness, so he can be hard to follow, but his writing is absolutely beautiful because of this.

On the Road is definitely a classic piece of American literature and since I don’t want to give too much away, you should definitely take the time to read it! (Also, there’s a movie that was recently made based on the book, but it’s definitely not as good as the book and you should only watch it after reading On the Road!)

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I’ve never heard of this book before! I guess that means I definitely need to read it. Thanks for the post Maddie!

Want to read about more books to add to your to be read pile? Check out the other bloggers who’ve participated in FBF:

~Tiffany from Commoner Couture

~Alaska from Alaska Renee

~Leah from Leah of the Pack

~ Vanessa from A City Girl’s Guide to Life

~Erika from Bearika Rose

~Frances from Wanderlust Notes

~Chloe from Wanderlust in the Midwest

~Sophie from A Series of Tomfooleries

Want to join in the fun? Email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail dot com so you can submit your own post!

favorite book friday

Favorite Book Friday: Sophie from A Series of Tomfooleries

favorite book friday

Hello all! Today I’m so excited to have Sophie on the blog! She blogs over at A Series of Tomfooleries and her blog posts are funny as well as amazing. Go check her out, and read on to hear about one of her favorite books!

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As a kid, I loved to read. Sarah Dessen’s books spoke to my brace-faced, slightly chubby, pre-pubescent soul; Judy Blume said, “Hey, it’s okay that you think gaucho pants and sneakers is a good look…it will all work out for you”; the Harry Potter series…I never read. But I saw the movies.

Due to several factors, such as increasing workloads and an exciting (exciting in that it exists) social life, my adolescence and young adulthood has seen a decrease in reading for pleasure.

But, every once in a while, a great tome comes along that makes you want to shut off Real Housewives, plop onto a fancy beanbag chair from Brookstone (or, at least look at one on Amazon that you can’t afford,) and spend some quiet time engaging with the written word.

For me, that tome is, Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling.

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Before you accuse me of choosing books based on font size and the ratio of pink to other colors in the cover design, let me tell you what I look for in a book.

When I choose a book, I’m thinking about two things:

1. How will this book’s pages deal with chocolate stains? Are the pages sturdy? Absorbent? Thick?

2. Will this book make me laugh?

I love to laugh, and I love books that will make me laugh. It doesn’t have to be a belly laugh or a cackle…a light chuckle will do.

(I also love chocolate. Hence the chocolate stain concerns.)

When I picked up Mindy’s book three years ago, I was excited to read it. Yes because I love Mindy Kaling – her show, her characters, and her humor. But also because I was/am really interested in how she tells her story.

Everyone has a story. Maybe you come from a family of professional whale watchers? Or maybe your grandfather invented the Twinkie and now you spend your summers on a yacht near Aruba? Or, maybe you come from a nice home in a nice town with cows and grass and you spend your days minding the sheep. Everyone has a story.

Mindy tells her story in a way that, at times, makes you want to cry about what she’s saying and laugh at how she says it.

Mindy takes you through the stages of life – some good, some ripe with confusion and missteps – that made her who she is today.

There was the time a classmate called her chubby; the time when she only had one friend (and she was a “Saturday friend”); the time she tried to push a skit about cats on the people of SNL and it failed (miserably).

There was also the time she dined with Amy Poehler; the time she wrote a major screenplay with her BFF in their Brooklyn apartment; the time she wrote “The Dundees,” arguably one of the funniest episodes of “The Office.”

Mindy wasn’t a beauty queen or a cheerleader. Her youth wasn’t filled social “get togethers” and “parties” and “stopping eating when you’re full.” She spent time with her parents! She read books! She made comedy sketches! She ate a lot! She knows her youth wasn’t the Hollywood version, with Pottery Barn Teen-esque rooms and pool parties – but she also knows that all of those books and all of those sketches and all of that parental guidance are the backbone of her comedic fodder. All of those missteps and lonely moments in LA led to a major network T.V. show, a bank full of “new money,” and a whole bunch of people who like her for her.

Mindy’s self-awareness makes her a credible source for advice (in my eyes, anyway). Sure, she’ll advise you to eat the burger over the kale…but she’ll also reassure you that “almost no one who was a big star in high school is also big star later in life.” She’ll tell you to appreciate your family. She’ll also recommend that you treat your significant other like a teammate on your recreational softball team (this piece of advice makes more sense when she explains it).

But, the best advice I took from Mindy is the following:

“Sometimes you just have to put on lip gloss and pretend to be psyched.”

Because even when you’re the “chubby Indian girl” with one friend, a little lipgloss can make all the difference.

sophie2

Or, at least a difference.

Laughing at your own story is how you write a story worth laughing about. Mindy’s story is laugh-worthy, and that is why I love it.

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That’s awesome! I love a good book that can make you laugh as well as give out great advice. Thanks for sharing, Sophie!

Want to read about more books to add to your to be read pile? Check out the other bloggers who’ve participated in FBF:

~Tiffany from Commoner Couture

~Alaska from Alaska Renee

~Leah from Leah of the Pack

~ Vanessa from A City Girl’s Guide to Life

~Erika from Bearika Rose

~Frances from Wanderlust Notes

~Chloe from Wanderlust in the Midwest

Want to join in the fun? Email me at caughtbetweenthepagesblog at gmail dot com so you can send in your own favorite book post!