Tag Archives: history

Ancient Civilizations Brought to You Today

7 Dec

 I’m very interested in history and the different civilizations that thrived long before I was born. I know I’m not the only one fascinated by the idea of these people and places, yearning to know more about what a day in the life of a person living in ancient Greece, The Middle Ages, the Viking Age, or ancient Egypt was like.

I personally was most interested in ancient Greece, partly because I’ve read so much about the mythology there that I wanted to know how it applied to these people and their lives. Unfortunately in most history classes I’ve taken, there hasn’t been much time to focus on other parts of the world, let alone their ancient civilizations. I was also very, very excited to read about vikings. Who doesn’t want to know what it’d be like to live as one of them? Sure, they seem kind of rough and tough (and probably very, very cold) but what made them that way?

Fortunately, the series of “Everyday Life” books by Sterling Publishing don’t simply skim over dates and facts. The great thing about having one book focused on something I’m completely interested in is that I know I’m going to get a thorough understanding of these people.

In Ancient Greece: Everyday Life in the Birthplace of Western Civilization, not only are their sections about their gods and heroes but there are portions that talk about what the people typically ate, how their educational system worked, how their criminal trials proceeded, what happened with weddings . . I could go on and on about all of the separate detailed sections that addressed different aspects of Greek life that I never even thought to ask about!

Viking Age: Everyday Life During the Extraordinary Era of the Norsemen is set up similarly but of course has a plethora of unique information for you to learn so you can surprise your friends with fun facts about Vikings. Of course I enjoyed reading about the different types of ships they had, one of the things these people were most known for, but I also liked reading about what clothing they wore, how they fought battles, how their names were constructed, and what medicine they used.

Both texts are split into several chapters that are further split into sections that pertain to the subject of the chapter. The reading is anything but dense; I could read these books on my own time, for my own enjoyment, and I loved every minute of it.

I highly recommend the “Everyday Life” books and hope that you’ll check out at least one of them! What’s your favorite ancient civilization to learn about?

Deck Z by Chris Pauls

11 Aug

Deck Z

author : chris pauls

pages : [paperback] 222

summary :

Imagine being trapped aboard the doomed Titanic on an icy Atlantic. . . with the walking dead. This fast-paced thriller reimagines the historical events of the fateful Titanic voyage through the lens of zombie mayhem. Captain Edward Smith and his inner circle desperately try to contain a weaponized zombie virus smuggled on board with the 2,200 passengers sailing to New York. Faced with an exploding population of lumbering, flesh-hungry undead, Smith’s team is forced into bloody hand-to-hand combat down the narrow halls of the huge steamer. In its few short days at sea, the majestic Titanic turns into a Victorian bloodbath, steaming at top speed toward a cold, blue iceberg. A creepy, tense page-turner, Deck Z will thrill zombie fans and Titanic buffs alike.

review :

I have to admit that I didn’t have the highest expectations for this book. I was just looking for something a little out of the ordinary and less serious to read during the summer. Unfortunately even those expectations weren’t met in this book. I love reading about the Titanic, I love reading about zombies, and I figured combining the two would at least make a basically decent and enjoyable novel. Hopefully I won’t be making that mistake again.

I will say that it was interesting reading the beginning of the book, set in Germany before the launch of the Titanic. It involves the whole explanation of why zombies and why the Titanic, though I think some of the suspense lost its steam before the ship even sailed away. This was mostly due to the fact that the characters felt very flat and faraway, making me unable to connect with them.

There were a few good, interesting scenes in the book but I think that they could have benefitted from a better writing style. I didn’t really like the way that the book was written, making it very dry when there were great action scenes going on. The characters were very clever in how they kept stopping the zombies and attempting to contain the outbreak. I like how while they were dealing with that problem they were also needing to worry about sinking, as the part where the ill-fated ship hits the iceberg is still included in this adaptation.

I wouldn’t really recommend this book unless you need something quick to read.

2/5 stars

You might want to read Warm Bodies or This is Not a Test instead.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

7 Nov

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Author: Ransom Riggs

Pages [hardcover]: 352

memorable quote: We cling to our fairy tales until the price for believing in them becomes too high.

favorite characters: Olive & Jacob

summary:

A mysterious island.

An abandoned orphanage.

A strange collection of very curious photographs.

It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

review:

As soon as I saw that cover, I knew I was going to read the book. Is that a bad way to pick what you’re going to read next? Probably. Was it worth it? Yes, because there were plenty more wonderful pictures where that came from, all scattered throughout the book. I was tempted to sneak a peek at all of them before I began reading, but I decided not to. I think that was a good decision, because the pictures directly relate to what’s happening in the plot, usually when Jacob finds or thinks of a photo. That adds so much to the story!

Besides that, the characters are fantastic. I had no idea where Miss Peregrine’s was going to take me, and I loved every step of the ride. The beginning, I admit, I rushed over a bit, wanting to get into the more ‘peculiar’ part of the book. It was interesting in its own right-detailing how everyone and their mother thought Jacob was insane-but once the peculiar parts started, I couldn’t put the book down, and finished the rest that day.

Although there were a few parts of it that I didn’t like, and can’t really talk about without adding a few spoilers-which I’m not going to do-the book, overall, was great. I loved it. It’s something I’ll re-read, and those pictures…some of them were downright creepy. Some oddly beautiful. Some, I wouldn’t like to see if I was home alone, late at night . . .

And, finally-ugh! I didn’t know that there was going to be a sequel. Or, at least, it seems like there’s build-up for one. Not that I mind reading more about this, but I hate going into a novel, thinking it will be completely tied up at the end . . . and be left with as many questions as I started with. Oh, well.

PECULIARLY AWESOME. 5/5 stars

Check out the book trailer! I remembered that I saw it months ago. It’s probably the best trailer I’ve ever seen. And..ugh. More creepiness.

Song of the Sparrow by Lisa Ann Sandell

9 Jul

 

Song of the Sparrow

Author: Lisa Ann Sandell

Pages [hardcover]: 416

Memorable Quote: Still, I look down, and the grass is so green, I cannot understand how it does not wither and die with sorrow.

Favorite Characters: Tristan & Elaine

Summary:

The year is 490 AD. Fiery 16-year-old Elaine of Ascolat, the daughter of one of King Arthur’s supporters, lives with her father on Arthur’s base camp, the sole girl in a militaristic world of men. Elaine’s only girl companion is the mysterious Morgan, Arthur’s older sister, but Elaine cannot tell Morgan her deepest secret: She is in love with Lancelot, Arthur’s second-in-command. However, when yet another girl — the lovely Gwynivere– joins their world, Elaine is confronted with startling emotions of jealousy and rivalry. But can her love for Lancelot survive the birth of an empire?

Review:

 I was assigned to read this book as part of the YA Best Overlooked Book Battle 2011, hosted by Alyssa over at The Shady Glade. At first I wasn’t sure what to think; I’m just starting to get into historical fiction, and this didn’t sound like something I’d ache to pick up on my own. But by giving it a chance, I was pleasantly surprised.

Song of the Sparrow follows Elaine, the only girl in an army camp full of men. She’s grown up there, away from the limitations that were enforced upon women at that time, free to roam as she pleased, though still not allowed to fight for her country. As a result, she’s often left behind, alone, as everyone she knows and loves marches off into battle.

I loved that this novel was written in verse. I didn’t know that until I began reading, and verse books are something of a guilty pleasure for me. The smooth way the lines flowed, the way each thing that came up was so beautifully described through Elaine’s perspective, kept me coming back for more, wanting to read on and on. I couldn’t get enough of it.

The characters in this book, though the minor ones dimmed in comparison to Elaine, were great. Each held true to their own purpose, and won me over, whether they were good or evil. I liked reading about how Arthur and the other knights were brotherly toward Elaine, working for her best interests and trying to protect her. And I loved how she in turn wanted to protect them, though sometimes this meant disobeying them and doing dangerous things.

The legend of King Arthur is one that I know well, though never before have I read something like this. It was a refreshing take, told from a female perspective, and actually made the women heroic, for once, instead of having the knights take all of the glory. That little ‘girl power’ addition fit in nicely.

All in all, this book was practically perfect to me. I read through it very quickly, loved every moment of it, and wish there was more. The ending was brilliant, the characters witty and captivating. I highly recommend Song of the Sparrow, even to those that do not normally read historical fiction. I don’t, and this only encourages me to read more. Though I may be disappointed; I don’t know what can live up to the standards this has set. I give it 5/5 stars.

Uncommon Criminals by Ally Carter

28 Jun

Uncommon Criminals

Author: Ally Carter [also wrote: Only the Good Spy Young]

Pages [hardcover]: 298

Heist Society #2
Book 1: Heist Society

Memorable Quote: “I for one like chaos. Chaos looks good on me.”

Favorite Characters: Kat & Hale

Summary:

Katarina Bishop has worn a lot of labels in her short life: Friend. Niece. Daughter. Thief. But for the last two months she’s simply been known as the girl who ran the crew that robbed the greatest museum in the world. That’s why Kat isn’t surprised when she’s asked to steal the infamous Cleopatra Emerald so it can be returned to its rightful owners.

There are only three problems. First, the gem hasn’t been seen in public in thirty years. Second, since the fall of the Egyptian empire and the suicide of Cleopatra, no one who holds the emerald keeps it for long — and in Kat’s world, history almost always repeats itself. But it’s the third problem that makes Kat’s crew the most nervous, and that is . . . the emerald is cursed.

Kat might be in way over her head, but she’s not going down without a fight. After all, she has her best friend — the gorgeous Hale — and the rest of her crew with her as they chase the Cleopatra around the globe, dodging curses and realizing that the same tricks and cons her family has used for centuries are useless this time.

Which means, this time, Katarina Bishop is making up her own rules.

Review:

 I’ve always had a thing for thieves, and a great love of all things-books, movies, shows-centered around heists. As a result, this series is the ultimate addiction for me. I couldn’t put this book down; not only because I wanted to see how the plan would fall into place, but because there was another plot twist around every corner that kept me flipping the pages and holding my breath with anticipation.

I love how Kat is forced to deal with her own problems in this sequel. She’s been trying to do a more heroic form of stealing, taking only what was wrongfully taken from an owner in the first place. She’s been going on more and more dangerous jobs, all on her own, with no backup. While she’s a strong, independent teen who won’t listen to anyone’s advice and attempts to struggle through things on her own, she also has a group of great friends that try to give him some perspective.

Speaking of her friends, I like how each of them is characterized perfectly and given their own personality and set of flaws. They stay true to themselves, even if it nearly botches an operation or makes everyone else hate them momentarily.

I could also picture everything perfectly as it was happening, which was awesome. I could see Kat trying to work out how to get the emerald. I could see her moving through every step of the plan, trying to get everything to work perfectly.

I give Uncommon Criminals 5/5 stars. It is a great book that I will reread over and over again. I can’t wait for the next installment of this series! I just hope it will be as fantastic as the first two.

Cloaked by Alex Flinn

24 Jun

 

Cloaked

Author: Alex Flinn [also wrote: A Kiss in Time & Beastly]

Pages: 341

Memorable Quote: He bursts into tears, and not some manlike tears either, where you pretend you’re brushing something off your face and, incidentally, wipe a tear. Nope. He starts bawling like a kid who spilled his Slushie…

Favorite Characters: Meg & Todd

Summary

I’m not your average hero. I actually wasn’t your average anything. Just a poor guy working an after-school job at a South Beach shoe repair shop to help his mom make ends meet. But a little magic changed it all.

It all started with a curse. And a frognapping. And one hot-looking princess, who asked me to lead a rescue mission.

There wasn’t a fairy godmother or any of that. And even though I fell in love along the way, what happened to me is unlike any fairy tale I’ve ever heard. Before I knew it, I was spying with a flock of enchanted swans, talking (yes, talking!) to a fox named Todd, and nearly trampled by giants in the Everglades.

Don’t believe me? I didn’t believe it either. But you’ll see. Because I knew it all was true, the second I got cloaked.

Review:

 I love Alex Flinn! Every book I read by her just makes me love her a little more. Twisted or modernized fairy tales are a bit of a guilty pleasure for me, but Cloaked takes off a bit of the guilt by making me feel like I’m learning about new stories that may not have had the spotlight they’ve deserved in recent years. Sure, I’m completely familiar with The Elves and the Shoemaker and The Frog Prince. Ever heard of The Six Swans or The Valiant Tailor or The Salad? I hadn’t, until I read this. Now I’ll definitely have to look up a few of those, especially the last. The title is . . . interesting. By mixing elements from all of the aforementioned titles as well as many more, Alex Flinn serves up a brand new fairy tale that will have you flipping the pages to find out what happens next.

Johnny, a poor and overworked shoe repair guy, with dreams of designing his own shoes, is a great main character. While he does have several unselfish motives, he still does a few things solely for himself (a shoe pun? Did I just do that?). I liked how while most of his intentions were pure, he was still realistic. I don’t know of many people who would put their lives on the line for a complete stranger, albeit a very beautiful one.

This book was funny one moment, serious the next, and overall it had a ‘quest’ feel to it that made it seem like an old tale while the setting was modern day Florida. It had a little bit of everything in it; romance, suspense, comedy, evil villains, brave heroes . . .

Cloaked was wonderful, and definitely a novel I’ll remember for a long time! It’s as great as the other two twisted fairy tales by the same author, Beastly and A Kiss in Time. I can’t wait to read more and branch out into the other books written by Alex Flinn. I’m sure they’ll be just as good!

I give Cloaked 5/5 stars.

A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray

10 Jun



A Great and Terrible Beauty

Author: Libba Bray

Pages [hardcover]: 403

Memorable Quote: “How can my ankles and arms be obscene?”

Favorite Characters: Pippa and her knight, Reginald

Summary:

A Victorian boarding school story, a Gothic mansion mystery, a gossipy romp about a clique of girlfriends, and a dark other-worldly fantasy–jumble them all together and you have this complicated and unusual first novel.

Sixteen-year-old Gemma has had an unconventional upbringing in India, until the day she foresees her mother’s death in a black, swirling vision that turns out to be true. Sent back to England, she is enrolled at Spence, a girls’ academy with a mysterious burned-out East Wing. There Gemma is snubbed by powerful Felicity, beautiful Pippa, and even her own dumpy roommate Ann, until she blackmails herself and Ann into the treacherous clique. Gemma is distressed to find that she has been followed from India by Kartik, a beautiful young man who warns her to fight off the visions. Nevertheless, they continue, and one night she is led by a child-spirit to find a diary that reveals the secrets of a mystical Order. The clique soon finds a way to accompany Gemma to the other-world realms of her visions “for a bit of fun” and to taste the power they will never have as Victorian wives, but they discover that the delights of the realms are overwhelmed by a menace they cannot control. Gemma is left with the knowledge that her role as the link between worlds leaves her with a mission to seek out the “others” and rebuild the Order. A Great and Terrible Beauty is an impressive first book in what should prove to be a fascinating trilogy.

Review:

 I didn’t expect to like this book. It started very slow for me, with several attempts at starting it, setting it aside, and then starting over once again. Finally, I convinced myself to read it, and once I was about a third of the way through, I began to like it, though there were a few things that hindered my enjoyment.

Gemma wants to make friends. In that respect, she’s exactly like any other teen girl. But she complains about how Ann immediately abandons her whenever it looks like it will make her more popular. A few chapters later she’s willing to do anything to keep the friends she’s managed to make, despite not actually wanting to participate. She’s a hypocrite, but then again, many people are. This irked me, and made me dislike her, because combined with her selfish attitude, she seemed exactly like the people she did not like.

I did think the supporting characters were wonderfully defined, and raised the plot immensely. Kartik was delightfully mysterious, though sometimes it seemed forced, and Pippa was the group’s romantic, though air-headed member. Even the teachers, so often neglected in young adult novels, had personalities and lives of their own.

While it isn’t one of the best books I’ve read, the plot of A Great and Terrible Beauty was unique and gripping. I kept wanting to see what would happen next-if the danger level would rise-but perhaps the great event I’ve been looking forward to happening will occur in the next book. I’ll definitely have to get that, and read more of Gemma’s journey of discovering herself.

I give A Great and Terrible Beauty 4/5 stars. Recommended for those who like historical fiction with fantasy thrown in.

A Golden Web by Barbara Quick

1 Jun

A Golden Web

Author: Barbara Quick

Pages: [hardcover] 266

Favorite Characters: Nicco & Pierina

Memorable Quote: “But history has lately been revealed to me as the place where I live, where we all live, side by invisible side with others who – if we get quiet enough and listen carefully enough – will touch us and tell us their stories.”

Summary:

Alessandra is desperate to escape.

Desperate to escape her stepmother, who’s locked her away for a year; to escape the cloister that awaits her and the marriage plans that have been made for her; to escape the expectations that limit her and every other girl in fourteenth-century Italy. There’s no tolerance in her quiet village for Alessandra and her keen intelligence and unconventional ideas.

In defiant pursuit of her dreams, Alessandra undertakes an audacious quest, her bravery equaled only by the dangers she faces. Disguised and alone in a city of spies and scholars, Alessandra will find a love she could not foresee — and an enduring fame.

In this exquisite imagining of the centuries-old story of Alessandra Giliani, the world’s first female anatomist, acclaimed novelist Barbara Quick gives readers the drama, romance, and rich historical detail for which she is known as she shines a light on an unforgotten — and unforgettable — heroine.

Review:

 This book had me from the start. The writing style of A Golden Web had me feeling like a was reading an old fairy tale, mixed with a piece of history. It was quickly paced, easily read, and enjoyable from beginning to end. It certainly makes me appreciate how many opportunities I have in life in this time period, as opposed to a girl my age in Alessandra’s time. I’d hate to be married off, or forced to forget my own wishes for the future. These are exactly the sort of things that she faces, and has to fight against.

I love Alessandra’s rebellious stance, and how she tries to keep herself happy and get what she wants. She doesn’t try to bend to any other’s will, and I like this independence about her. She was very likeable-an important trait in any character-and had definition to her. She wasn’t flat or boring in the slightest.

I loved the historical aspect of the book. Beginning it, I half believed it was pure fiction, but when I reached the end and realized that Alessandra had indeed once been alive, the novel took on an entirely different context for me. I’m always up for learning a bit of history, and knowing someone could push the limits in this way just makes me think of where the world would be today, if it weren’t for those who pushed against society’s boundaries.

I found A Golden Web to be a quick, delightful read that will definitely stick around with me for a while. I give it 5/5 stars, and recommend it to those who like history, strong female characters, or a great read.

A Golden Web – Blog Tour – Tens List

23 May

Today I’m happy to welcome Barbara Quick, author of A Golden Web, to my blog! As part of the tour, she provided a fun list of top disguises to wear.

Top 10 Disguises to Wear

  1. A fly on the wall. Whether you’re an aspiring writer or actor, watching and listening unobserved will help you create three-dimensional and fully believable characters.
  2. Yourself as a boy. Alessandra Giliani did it in A Golden Web because it allowed her to study medicine at a time when females were barred from the university. There are places in the world right now where parents are cross-dressing their girls as boys to allow them to get an education
  3. Yourself as a child. Remember—really remember—what it felt like before the world tried to talk you out of being who you really are. It’s a big help in remembering what’s important to you.
  4. Yourself at the end of your life. There’s nothing like a fantasy of The Very End to help you notice and appreciate the sweet details of your daily life.
  5. A pair of someone else’s shoes (particularly if he or she is someone who seems to be dense, mean, unfair or all three). Fiction writers have to learn to love their villains, too.
  6. An evening gown, a push-up bra and a flower in your hair. (Certainly no explanation is needed.)
  7. A mud queen. Turn over some earth and plant something. Allow yourself to get dirty. Remember that the Earth is your mother.
  8. Julia Child or some other Iron Chef. Download a recipe for something highly delicious you’ve only eaten or seen at restaurants. If something jumps out of the frying pan onto the floor, discreetly throw it back in.
  9. Rock star. The closest I ever got to this one was doing a reading and book signing in Fairbanks, Alaska, in the dead of winter, for my first novel, Northern Edge, when the weather outside was 35 degrees below zero. Lots and lots of people came to see me. (Fairbanks will always have a special place in my heart!).
  10.  A dancer in Carnival! Take it from me: There’s nothing like a set of wings and sequins to put you in a cheerful mood.

Thanks so much, Barbara! This list definitely made my day.

Please check out the rest of this awesome tour, and come back June 1 for my review of A Golden Web!

Sunday, May 15: Ashley at Basically Amazing (Review)
Monday, May 16: Christie at The Fiction Enthusiast (In Her Own Words)
Tuesday, May 17: Erika at Moonlight Book Reviews (Character Interview: Alessandra)
Wednesday, May 18: Danna at Friendly Reader (Review)
Thursday, May 19: Britta at I Like These Books (Guest Post)
Friday, May 20: Lexie at Last  Exile Words (Review)
Saturday, May 21: Julia at Rex Robot Reviews (Video Interview)Sunday, May 22: Melissa at Mel’s Books and Info  (Review)
Monday, May 23: Kayla at Caught Between The Pages (Tens List)
Tuesday, May 24: Arya at Sea of Pages (Teenage Garage Sale)
Wednesday, May 25: Julia at Rex Robot Reviews (Review)
Thursday, May 26: Corrine at Lost For Words (Cover Post)
Friday, May 27: Kathy at I Am A Reader, Not A Writer (Review)
Saturday, May 28: Cindy at Books Complete Me (Video Interview)

Sunday, May 29: Britta at I Like These Books (Review)
Monday, May 30: Sandy at Pirate Penguin Reads (Editorial Interview)
Tuesday, May 31: Lexie at Last Exile Words  (Character Interview )
Wednesday, June 1: Kayla at Caught Between The Pages  (Review)
Thursday, June 2: Melissa at Mel’s Books and Info (Into the Past)
Friday, June 3: Jessica at A Fanatic Book Blog(Review)
Saturday, June 4: Danna at Friendly Reader (Guest Post)

Sunday, June 5: Christie at The Fiction Enthusias (Review)
Monday, June 6: Kathy at I Am A Reader, Not A Writer (Character Tweets)
Tuesday, June 7: Ashley at Basically Amazing (Tens List)
Wednesday, June 8: Erika at Moonlight Book Reviews (Review)
Thursday, June 9: Kari at A Good Addiction (Video Interview)
 Friday, June 10: Cindy at Books Complete Me (Review)
Saturday, June 11: Jessica at Hopelessly Devoted Bibliophile (When I’m Not Writing)

 

Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

8 Mar

 

Water for Elephants

Author: Sara Gruen

Pages [paperback]: 331

Opening Lines: Only three people were left under the red and white awning of the grease joint: Grady, me, and the fry cook. Grady and I sat at a battered wooden table, each facing a burger on a dented tin plate.

Memorable Quote: “Keeping up the appearance of having all your marbles is hard work, but important.”

Favorite Characters: Walter, Marlena, Jacob, & Rosie

Available now!

Summary:

Though he may not speak of them, the memories still dwell inside Jacob Jankowski’s ninety-something-year-old mind. Memories of himself as a young man, tossed by fate onto a rickety train that was home to the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth. Memories of a world filled with freaks and clowns, with wonder and pain and anger and passion; a world with its own narrow, irrational rules, its own way of life, and its own way of death. The world of the circus: to Jacob it was both salvation and a living hell.

Jacob was there because his luck had run out – orphaned and penniless, he had no direction until he landed on this locomotive ‘ship of fools’. It was the early part of the Great Depression, and everyone in this third-rate circus was lucky to have any job at all. Marlena, the star of the equestrian act, was there because she fell in love with the wrong man, a handsome circus boss with a wide mean streak. And Rosie the elephant was there because she was the great gray hope, the new act that was going to be the salvation of the circus; the only problem was, Rosie didn’t have an act – in fact, she couldn’t even follow instructions. The bond that grew among this unlikely trio was one of love and trust, and ultimately, it was their only hope for survival.

Review:

I came into this book not expecting much at all, and ended up excessively loving it! This is one of those stories where you think you’ve figure out exactly how everything is going to go . . . And then nothing turns out the way you thought it would.

Books that have a frame for the story like Water for Elephants had will, if done well, really get me to know and love the characters. Having Jacob’s narration of the circus events interrupted by ‘present day Jacob’ was a nice little detail. I definitely felt sad for the ninety-something year old, feeling nearly helpless and lonely. As he feels he’s losing control of his life, his mind slips back to the past, and through these lapses we’re told the story.

I never knew anything about how circuses traveled about in the past, and hearing about the cutthroat America during the Great Depression certainly brought an overpowering feel of reality to the story. Jobs were few and far between, and those that had them did anything they could to keep them. Describing the desperate times, the hobo jungles, and the pay cuts served to present a great representation of the time period.

I loved hearing about the different circus acts, though I know that was but a miniscule part of the story. The tiny facts and funniest little things kept my interest and had me smiling. This book is definitely dark and depressing at moments. At others, it is brilliantly bright and full of hope. Any novel that can pull off both sides of the spectrum nearly flawlessly is excellent in my book.

I give Water for Elephants 5/5 stars. It was fantastic, and I’ll definitely have to check out the upcoming movie now! I really recommend it. I have a feeling it is one of those books I will never forget.

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