Tag Archives: Short story

Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King

20 Jan

Full Dark, No Stars

author : stephen king

pages [hardcover] 368

summary :

A new collection of four never-before-published stories from Stephen King.

1922
The story opens with the confession of Wilfred James to the murder of his wife, Arlette, following their move to Hemingford, Nebraska onto land willed to Arlette by her father.

Big Driver
Mystery writer, Tess, has been supplementing her writing income for years by doing speaking engagements with no problems. But following a last-minute invitation to a book club 60 miles away, she takes a shortcut home with dire consequences.

Fair Extension
Harry Streeter, who is suffering from cancer, decides to make a deal with the devil but, as always, there is a price to pay.

A Good Marriage
Darcy Anderson learns more about her husband of over twenty years than she would have liked to know when she stumbles literally upon a box under a worktable in their garage

review :

I love reading Stephen King books because they’re really starting to get me into horror as well as bringing me into the mindset that both YA and adult books can be enjoyable and the reader doesn’t have to prefer one or the other. King does a fantastic job of creating his stories, drawing the reader in and allowing them to feel along with the character what is happening. There’s a certain skill in his slow build-up of tinier details that can be appreciated just as much if not more so than in your face gore and scare tactics.

I love how in each story a different character is presented. A murderer, a victim, someone who stands aside while another’s life is destroyed, the relative of a victim. Literally as soon as I would finish one of the stories and think to myself that I’d like to here something from some generic character perspective, it would be there right in the next tale. The differences between all of them as well as the qualities that link them together make each story captivating and different.

My favorite had to be Fair Extension, though it was also one of the harder ones for me to read. The cruelty of it got to me more than flat-out murder did, which was completely unexpected for me and a show of great writing on King’s part.

I recommend this both to fans of short stories and Stephen King fans. This isn’t my favorite work of his but as I’m expanding my horizons and looking into more of his books, it has me looking to read more.

4/5 stars

The Curiosities by Maggie Stievater, Tessa Gatton, & Brenna Yovanoff

16 Dec

The Curiosities

a collection by maggie stiefvater, tessa gratton, & brenna yovanoff

pages : [hardcover] 304

summary :

From acclaimed YA authors Maggie Stiefvater, Tessa Gratton, and Brenna Yovanoff comes The Curiosities: A Collection of Stories.

- A vampire locked in a cage in the basement, for good luck.
- Bad guys, clever girls, and the various reasons why the guys have to stop breathing.
- A world where fires never go out (with references to vanilla ice cream).

These are but a few of the curiosities collected in this volume of short stories by three acclaimed practitioners of paranormal fiction.

But The Curiosities is more than the stories. Since 2008, Maggie, Tessa, and Brenna have posted more than 250 works of short fiction to their website merryfates.com. Their goal was simple: create a space for experimentation and improvisation in their writing—all in public and without a backspace key. In that spirit, The Curiosities includes the stories and each author’s comments, critiques, and kudos in the margins. Think of it as a guided tour of the creative processes of three acclaimed authors.

So, are you curious now?

review:

I love anthologies, but I think I enjoy more conventional ones than this one about writing and experimental writing. The three authors work together and against each other to create stories that sometimes seem half-finished, because they don’t have the regular polish of editing or a longer period of work. This isn’t to say that I didn’t enjoy this, I just think that I was hoping for something a little more.

I liked the little comments that all three put in each others’ stories as well as their own; that made things more interesting. I also liked the little explanations of how a story came about or what idea the author latched onto that really inspired them to write that story. While not many of them stuck out to me after reading, I could appreciate the writing process and all of the tips throughout the collection. I think that this book would be valuable for anyone who is looking to better their writing or is wondering what to do when they find themselves stuck for ideas or writing that they’ll like.

I really recommend this collection for aspiring writers. Being able to see into the creative process of three writers who’ve already made names for themselves is definitely what makes this unique and useful.

4/5 stars

Steampunk: Poe

26 Apr

Steampunk: Poe

Written By: Edgar Allen Poe

Illustrated By: Zdenko Basic & Manuel Sumberac

pages: 264

memorable stories: the spectacles, the raven

summary:

If you combined clockwork gears, parasols, and air balloons with Edgar Allan Poe, what would you get? Steampunk: Poe! This is the first collection ever of Poe stories illustrated with the influence of steampunk. Running Press Teens has selected some of the most popular, thrilling, and memorable stories and poems by the classic 19th century American writer whose literary talent continues to open the mind to countless interpretations.Every Poe story and poems is fully illustrated with steampunk-inspired art—from 1920s aviation gear to elaborate musical instruments—creating a fresh perspective on his work containing bizarre characters of madmen and mystery. Just in time for Halloween, Steampunk: Poe is the perfect classic horror choice with a haunting steampunk twist!

review:

I was soooo extremely ecstatic when I walked into my library and spotted this book! I first noticed it on Goodreads and thought that it would turn out to be one of those books I’d admire from afar but would never get the chance to get my hands on. Little did I know that someone out there saw fit to supply my local library with a copy, making me happy and hopefully introducing others to Poe’s work through the wonderful illustrations, as steampunk is so popular right now. Though I never would have thought the two would go together.

I have a sort of love/hate relationship with Edgar Allen Poe because I either really enjoy his stories and poems or detest them entirely. And I have no idea why this is. The same was true for this collection; I’d already read a handful before, but wanted to re-experience them complete with the pictures, anyway. Sometimes the images fit in wonderfully, making it all the more gruesome or mysterious. At other times I think that it would have been better had other scenes been selected for illustration because the panels didn’t fit in quite as well.

I found a few new favorite works by Poe, as well as had the opportunity to revisit some old ones. There were a few that I was very, very tempted to abandon and skim through . . . But I managed to resist that impulse. This book took me longer to read than I thought that it would because of that.

I’d recommend this book for fans of classic horror stories, Edgar Allen Poe (obviously), steampunk, pictures, literature, classics . . .

WOEFULLY INTRIGUING.3/5 stars

(Or should I say . . . Poe-fully? Heh.)

Teeth: Vampire Tales edited by Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling

25 Mar

Teeth

Editors: Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling

(Because I’m too lazy I’m not going to list every author because there are like 20 but suffice it to say they’re all equally talented and awesome. Yeah, I know right? You’d think with this many stories they wouldn’t all be that good. But they were. I’m getting ahead of myself.)

Pages : [paperback] 452

memorable stories: things to know about being dead, all smiles, vampire weather, &  best friends forever

summary:

Sink your teeth into these bite-sized tales exploring the intersections among the living, dead, and undead. Features stories by Neil Gaiman, Melissa Marr, Cassandra Clare, Holly Black, Garth Nix, and many more.

review:

I ended up randomly choosing to check this book out at the library last week, not expecting much from it as I haven’t been very into vampires lately. Not because of a specific book, just . . . tired of it all, I guess. But I was sucked in by seeing the great authors mentioned on the cover (which I suppose was the intended purpose of them doing such a thing) and ended up not just enjoying but loving this!

I listed a few of my favorite stories above and it was hard to even narrow it down to four out of . . . nineteen? I think there is something like that many stories. I liked every one of them. Really. How often can you pick up a collection and say that? And one where every story is about vampires! And they were all unique! I loved how some of them took the idea of a vampire from various cultures around the world, all slightly differing from one another, and made it their own. There were funny stories that had me laughing uncontrollably, devastating ones that made me want to cry, ones that were hopeful and ones where you lost all hope . . .

Altogether, a great mix. There wasn’t too much of any one thing. Male and female protagonists and antagonists, first person narration as well as third and a bit of second thrown in one. (Read it to see what I mean. Come on. Do it.) Love and romance and betrayal and creepy creatures that will definitely give me nightmares.

It’s hard to find many things to be critical of because each short story was so unique and interesting and I definitely can’t analyze each in turn. Maybe I can just say that I was sad that it ended? This anthology really surprised me in the best way, coming up and getting me addicted. Just goes to show that once you think you’re done with a certain topic, authors unite to drag you back into it. I’m not going to complain.

FANG-TASTIC. 5/5 stars

Poor Rich by Jean Blasiar

30 Jan

Poor Rich

Author: Jean Blasiar

Pages [paperback]: 270

Favorite Character: U2

Summary:

Asthmatic, reclusive genius Rich Cameron has grown content with his sheltered life until one day the allergies that have plagued him since childhood suddenly disappear. With the help of a caring psychiatrist and an irreverent parrot named U2, Rich sets out into a strange new world.

Review:

This book was sent to me for review over the summer. I tried to start it then, but kept putting it off for books with faster plots. I finally settled down to read it around a month ago.

Rich is certainly an interesting character. He hasn’t made many friends, hasn’t done so many things normal kids and teens do because he used to be allergic to pretty much everything. When the allergies disappear, he has to try to figure out the world and his new place in it.

The book did have its good moments. I liked when he started tutoring his classmates and the different reactions he would get. Some of his short stories toward the end were good. But it got confusing at some points. The regular plot switching to a collection of stories with an explanation for each, and then randomly shifts back to the regular plot without a smooth changeover. It seemed too jolting and forced. I prefered the first part of the book to the second.

 I give Poor Rich 2/5 stars. It had its good moments, but I don’t think I’ll be reading it again.

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