interview · writer's chat

WRITERS CHAT! An interview with Katerina King

HELLO FRIENDS! Today I’m pleased to share an interview with Katerina King, current trilogy writer of witches!

Read below to hear more about her writing journey and where Katerina hopes to take her writing career!

katerina author photo

What is the first thing you remember writing?

I love characters, I love getting to know, developing them, treating them as if they are real people. For some readers, they keep reading depending on the plot or pacing or if the grammar is good or not. But for me as long as the characters were life like and I can relate or connect with them I can keep reading the book and that’s what I hope to convey in my works.

What is your favorite thing to write about?

Witches! Which I guess isn’t shocking considering my entire series and the next eight books after it all have to do with them. Its been an obsession since I was young.

Tell me one of your writing goals.

Finish book two of my trilogy by February of 2020.

Have any particular writers inspired you?

Rick Riordan, which if you don’t know who that is, he is the author of the Percy Jackson and Heroes of Olympus books.

Tell us about a favorite character you’ve created.

My favorite character that has walked into my headspace is Elijah Hutton and he is the best friend of my main character Scarlette Petrova. He is my favorite because there is such a complex nature to him, he grew up in an overly religious family that he thought was really tight but when he came out of the closet at seventeen he quickly learned that blood wasn’t always as thick as water.

Do you have any writing advice to share with us?

Just keep writing and don’t give up!

What’s the last book you read?

The last book I read… geez. A Twisted Fate by K. A Grayson

Katerina King is a fiction author who spends most of her time in the world of witches. Her debut novel, Malediction, is the first installment of the Ritual of the Court trilogy, which also has a multitude of planned spin-off novels and has just been published via Amazon. The easiest way to connect with her is through her Twitter @_KingKaterina.

THANK YOU so much for joining us, Katerina! I’m excited to check out that trilogy.

WRITER’S CHAT is a weekly feature where writers from all stages of their journey come to speak to us about their craft, spreading positivity, advice, and amazing book recommendations. Join us every Saturday!

 

 

4 stars · dystopia · Fantasy · reread review

Reread Reflection: Never Fade by Alexandra Bracken

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How do you review a book after you’ve already read it? Review the reread!

I absolutely loved The Darkest Minds which was the first book in this trilogy. When I finally got my hands on book three, I remembered pretty clearly what happened in that book and was less certain about Never Fade. That calls for a reread!

First of all, I have to admit Never Fade suffers from the second book slump. I like it, but nowhere near with the passion of how I loved book one. This involves more of the political intrigue, a lot less of the action. There’s a lot happening but it’s all verbal plot twists, not exactly action scenes, except for probably the very first and last scenes of the book. Ruby shuts down so much when she’s around the League that it’s hard to get a read on her for . . kind of anything, which leads to an unfortunate monotone in places when she’s trying not to feel and all.

There are some pretty good plot twists in here, though, and those easily kept me reading. I mean, it’s kind of like you’re thinking nothing else could go worse, and then everything goes much worse than you could ever think possible.

Before this reread, I couldn’t remember too much about Never Fade apart from pieces of the end of the book. And then I kept thinking, no, that couldn’t possibly be how it ends . . . but it does, and it still makes me a mixture of sad and angry. All in all, it made me unsure if this is a trilogy I’ll reread in its entirety again. I still have a special place in my heart for The Darkest Minds, because when I read that it felt so clever and unlike anything else I’d ever read. Never Fade brings in more dystopian tropes, and, well, I’ll be putting up my review of book three in a few days.

So, while I really liked this book, I don’t feel like I absolutely need this book.

 

 

3 stars · Fantasy · fiction · young adult

GLASS SWORD by Victoria Aveyard — are all trilogies the same nowadays?

glass-sword

Glass Sword

#2

author : victoria aveyard

pages : [hardcover] 444

memorable quote :

No one is born evil, just like no one is born alone.

favorite character : shade

summary :

If there’s one thing Mare Barrow knows, it’s that she’s different.

Mare Barrow’s blood is red—the color of common folk—but her Silver ability, the power to control lightning, has turned her into a weapon that the royal court tries to control.

The crown calls her an impossibility, a fake, but as she makes her escape from Maven, the prince—the friend—who betrayed her, Mare uncovers something startling: she is not the only one of her kind.

Pursued by Maven, now a vindictive king, Mare sets out to find and recruit other Red-and-Silver fighters to join in the struggle against her oppressors.

But Mare finds herself on a deadly path, at risk of becoming exactly the kind of monster she is trying to defeat.

Will she shatter under the weight of the lives that are the cost of rebellion? Or have treachery and betrayal hardened her forever?

The electrifying next installment in the Red Queen series escalates the struggle between the growing rebel army and the blood-segregated world they’ve always known—and pits Mare against the darkness that has grown in her soul.

review :

Oh Glass Sword, how I wanted to love you!

Red Queen was the kind of book where as soon as I finished reading it, I wanted to buy a copy for myself because the one I’d been reading was from the library and I needed one for my own collection. So, when I heard Victoria Aveyard would be touring near me for the sequel, I hopped on the chance to meet her, get some signed copies, and hear her speak. It was a really fun event, and I wouldn’t mind going to one of hers again. Glass Sword sat aside for a while, waiting to be read. I finally picked it up, read about half of it, and then had to take a break because I ended up moving and forgot about it for a short while. When I picked it up again, I flew through the rest of it, but . . . Maybe it goes to show just how nonexistent the plot was, for how easily I could piece it all together again after such a long time away from the middle of the book. And I’m an exceptionally forgetful person.

Glass Sword suffers from the worst of second book in a trilogy syndrome. It’s ALL about setting up for book three and dealing with the aftermath from book one. There were some cool, world-building moments in here that I liked. Hints that we’ll get to see actual involvement from other countries and places in this world–such a rare thing in YA when these catastrophic events seem to take place in one country while all of the others casually ignore what’s going down. There are even some hints that we might find out more about what made the world come to this, Silvers ruling over the Reds, and usually in these fantasy/dystopian type stories, the world is plopped in front of us with little explanation. So if Aveyard can deal out all of this in book three, that would be awesome.

Unfortunately, I’ve pretty much decided that I’ll get book three out of the library, if I end up deciding to read it at all.

Glass Sword follows Mare as she builds up the resistance that will change everything, raise up the Reds who’ve been oppressed, and . . . Well. I’m still not entirely certain what her end goals will be. She clearly doesn’t consider Reds and Silvers equal, so it isn’t that she’s fighting for equality (even though she’s in a curiously unhealthy relationship with Cal when they snuggle when neither of them want to deal with their emotions). But she also doesn’t want to be put up as some ‘Red Queen’ to be a new ruling class of Reds. I understand that maybe she hasn’t figured it all out for herself yet, but she hasn’t really thought it through. Because we’re reading it all from her perspective, I would like to know her mind a little better, and I find it hard enough to fathom why she makes some of the decisions she does.

I really like the world of this book. I think I might like the direction in which it will be moving. I’m just not sure I’ll stick with it long enough to get to that point.

3/5 stars

book tag

Top 10 2015 Releases I MEANT to Read

toptentuesday

This happens to me every. Year. There are books I’m so extremely excited to get to . . Then I get distracted and end up reading something else instead. Here are the ones that I’m going to end up reading in 2016 because 2015 just didn’t have enough time for reading in it!

1. Six of Crows. I absolutely loved Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone trilogy so I ordered this one as soon as it came out. It’s still on the TBR pile.

2. Shadow Scale. The problem with this one is that I LOVED the first book, Seraphina, but it took so long for the sequel to come out that I feel like I need to reread the first book before I get around to this one.

3. Invasion of the Tearling. The Queen of the Tearling was really great, but dense. Lately I’ve been wanting something a little easier to read so I’ve been putting this one off.

4. Queen of Shadows. So far, I have every book in Sarah J. Maas’ series apart from this one. It isn’t my favorite, but I do believe it gets better with each book, so I’m excited to read this one.

5. Never Never. A Peter Pan retelling. PETER PAN.

6. Zeroes. I attended a signing for this book and I STILL HAVEN’T READ IT.

7. The Lies About Truth. Courtney Stevens’ debut novel, Faking Normal,  was AMAZING, so I’m sure this book will be great as well; I just haven’t picked it up yet!

 

5 stars · Fantasy · series

Dreams of Gods and Monsters by Laini Taylor

Dreams of Gods and Monsters

Daughter of Smoke and Bone #3

author : laini taylor

pages : [hardcover] 613

memorable quote Once upon a time,an angel and a devil pressed their hands to their hearts

and started the apocalypse.

favorite characters : karou & akiva

summary :

By way of a staggering deception, Karou has taken control of the chimaera rebellion and is intent on steering its course away from dead-end vengeance. The future rests on her, if there can even be a future for the chimaera in war-ravaged Eretz.

Common enemy, common cause.

When Jael’s brutal seraph army trespasses into the human world, the unthinkable becomes essential, and Karou and Akiva must ally their enemy armies against the threat. It is a twisted version of their long-ago dream, and they begin to hope that it might forge a way forward for their people.

And, perhaps, for themselves. Toward a new way of living, and maybe even love.

But there are bigger threats than Jael in the offing. A vicious queen is hunting Akiva, and, in the skies of Eretz … something is happening. Massive stains are spreading like bruises from horizon to horizon; the great winged stormhunters are gathering as if summoned, ceaselessly circling, and a deep sense of wrong pervades the world.

What power can bruise the sky?

From the streets of Rome to the caves of the Kirin and beyond, humans, chimaera and seraphim will fight, strive, love, and die in an epic theater that transcends good and evil, right and wrong, friend and enemy.

At the very barriers of space and time, what do gods and monsters dream of? And does anything else matter?

review :

I finished this book a few weeks ago but I’ve had to sit on the review. That’s because for the past few years whenever someone asks me what my favorite book is (always an impossible question) I end up answering “Daughter of Smoke and Bone“. I ordered this book as soon as it was released, was dying to read it–and still couldn’t force myself to sit down with it because that meant the end of a trilogy I’ve been holding close to my heart. Something that influences my own writing, as well as showing me the kind of book that I’d die to work with as an editor. Eventually, lovingly, and fearful that I’d be spoiled (something I would never, ever recover from) I opened Dreams of Gods and Monsters.

It was perfect and yet nothing like I’d expected. Laini Taylor is always fantastic about crafting a story where the reader is certain they knew what will happen and then adding an extra twist, whether it be a setback or an entirely new villain. The books, for all their fantasy and chaos, are realistic in that most of these characters are not entirely good or evil, there is no single ‘bad guy’, and a lot of these people and chimera and angels just want the chance to live. This epic finale to a war that has raged for thousands of years will leave you crying.

I would have liked to have seen more of Karou and Akiva together . . . but, yes, they were in the middle of a war, and unlike most YA trilogies where protagonists find love in the midst of war, this angel and chimera actually pay more attention to saving thousands of lives than focusing on their relationship. But a few shared glances across a fire or secret invisible meetings can go a long way and get my heart beating a little faster over my favorite couple, ever. They’re just so sweet with each other, despite the past and occasional fighting.

There were some new characters, as well as old ones who were given more pages, that I came to adore. Like a new romantic pairing that was almost as heart-wrenchingly wonderful and sad and glorious as Karou and Akiva (possibly just as great and beautiful for me to love forever). Add on the characters I absolutely love to hate and this was a showdown that had me on the edge of my seat. I think I read through this in two days, hundreds of pages at a time because once I started I had to know what was going to happen. Had to know that everything would be alright.

The ending was perfect. Nothing like what I’d hoped for and yet it lends itself perfectly to me picturing how things might be for that universe a year or five or ten in the future, where the surviving characters might be and what new problems might arise. There was a little openness to the ending that had me hopeful that more would be announced, but I think that this is the end. As painful as that thought is, I’m okay with that. I can love and reread Karou and Akiva and all the rest. Whatever Laini Taylor reads next, I’m reading it. This author sets a bar that no other has passed for me.

5/5 stars

3 stars · dystopia · young adult

Prodigy by Marie Lu

Prodigy

Legend #2
Book 1: Legend

author : marie lu

pages : [hardcover] 371

memorable quote He is beauty, inside and out.
He is the silver lining in a world of darkness.

favorite character : day

summary :

Injured and on the run, it has been seven days since June and Day barely escaped Los Angeles and the Republic with their lives. Day is believed dead having lost his own brother to an execution squad who thought they were assassinating him. June is now the Republic’s most wanted traitor. Desperate for help, they turn to the Patriots – a vigilante rebel group sworn to bring down the Republic. But can they trust them or have they unwittingly become pawns in the most terrifying of political games?

review :

I have a feeling that this is a trilogy that only keeps getting better. While it isn’t one of my favorites (and I wanted so badly to love it!) these books have some great elements that I think everyone should take a look at. I love a book that makes you think.

For instance, just as soon as you’re sure you have it all figured out in Prodigy . . . something comes along and blows it all away. In an amazingly realistic sense. It’s hard to pinpoint who, exactly, is the bad guy here because everyone has their different motivations, their evils and kindnesses, and there are so many agendas going on that it’s difficult for June and Day to know who their real allies are. Apart from each other, of course. The way their relationship progressed was pretty sweet, too.

Again, I just have a problem with the writing style. I’m unsure of whether it’s Marie Lu or simply the way she crafted these books. I’m tempted to continue following her writing even after I finish Champion because she has amazing ideas and I WANT to be able to enjoy them more.

Something I really did love? The action. Yes, these books are perfect for people looking for an adrenaline rush–and if you need nothing else, I’m certain you’ll love them. There’s never a dull moment here because even when the characters are resting, it’s usually only because they’ve discovered a new and terrible plot twist that’s about to make a whole other mess come down on them.

 Day is still my favorite character to read because, come on, who doesn’t prefer the rebellious badass. I love June for who she is, the strength she has, and the beautifully sharp mind she’s got . . . but there’s just something about vigilante justice that’s that much cooler.

While these aren’t my favorite books, I’ll recommend that others at least give them a go. I know there are others out there who’ll love them more than me!

Writing: 55%
Characters: 80%
Romance: 60%
Action: 100%
Plot: 70%
Overall: 73%

3/5 stars

dystopia · series · young adult

Legend by Marie Lu

Legend

Legend #1

author : marie lu

pages : [hardcover] 305

memorable quote Each day means a new twenty-four hours. Each day means everything’s possible again.

favorite character : day

summary :

What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths—until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

review :

Legend. I’ve been hearing about it for years. I’ve even had the privilege of hearing Marie Lu speak at Book Con (twice!) before I even picked up one of her books. Possibly because by the time I heard about her trilogy, I was on dystopian overload and decided that I needed to give that genre a rest for a little while. Because it’s been a long time since I’ve read a dystopian I’ve loved, and my friend was kind enough to let me borrow these books from her, I finally dove into the world of Legend. I wasn’t immediately impressed.

The book alternates between Day, vigilante on the streets, and June, prodigy of the military nation they live in. What was awesome about Day’s chapters were that they were written in gold ink, which I thought was pretty unique and fun. The text itself fit into their personalities. Day is fighting for freedom and individuality; June prefers the black text, what’s expected, known, and follows the rules.

I think throughout the novel I began to look forward to Day’s chapters, probably because they often ended on mini cliffhangers and I wanted to know what was happening with him. It wasn’t that June ever truly bored me, but sometimes I wanted to push past her angst-y wondering and political problems to get to Day’s more pressing (and life-threatening) issues. He’s a fun character to read, but I never fully connected with him in Legend. I never understood why he needed to be on his own instead of joining the other rebels, why he wasn’t helping his family more.

I will say that there are some parts of his story I found really predictable and others that were refreshingly new. I did love how some parts of the story that I was waiting to happen (that I can’t discuss for fear of spoiling!) happened much sooner than I ever thought they would, so I had to wonder what could possibly happen next to complicate things enough to fill the novel.

I’m not sure if I’ll recommend Legend. While parts of the story are interesting, there is nothing distinctively unique about this that wowed me, particularly because I don’t think I connect with Lu’s writing style.

Writing: 50%
Characters: 75%
Romance: 60%
Action: 98%
Plot: 70%
Overall:  70.6%

3/5 stars

books to movies

Book to Movie: The Maze Runner

I’ve been so excited for this movie! When I first read the book, it was back when young adult movie adaptations were just getting started (think Twilight) and I was so sure that The Maze Runner was going to see the spotlight one day. I’m so excited that I got to see the movie on the day that it came out, after years of waiting!

I’d definitely recommend checking out the trailers for this movie because I think they did a fantastic job capturing some of the suspense and intrigue that really make this trilogy special. I’m no expert on film but really loved the angles used and how those few minutes really captured the emotion of the book as well as the movie.

Our leading man, Thomas,  is played by Dylan O’Brien. I’ve only seen a few episodes of Teen Wolf and he has a small appearance in The Internship but I always had it in my mind that he was a great actor so I was excited when I heard that he was Thomas. I think he did a fantastic job creating Thomas’ character even through the confusion and memory loss Thomas experiences. Because I haven’t seen O’Brien much on screen, I think that also made it easier for me to imagine him as that character.

The same was true for most of the boys. Some of them began to get mixed up with one another (because in a pack of all boys, things can get confusing) but overall I was happy with the group. Chuck was appropriately adorable. Alby was a great leader. I wish that we’d gotten to see a little more of Minho and Newt. Also, it’d been a while since I read the book, so I completely forgot Frypan’s name and they never directly introduced him in the movie. I was sitting there in the theater thinking, What are they calling him? Fred? Frank? until it clicked.

As with all book to movie adaptations, I was terrified that The Maze Runner was going to tear apart one of my favorite books. Instead, it showed off some scenes that looked absolutely amazing done in film. I think that the Grievers were awesome and terrifying, even though they were nothing like what I’d pictured in my head (think Robosnail from Rugrats, except smaller and more terrifying). The maze scenes were awesome, with all of those moving parts and great effects. The Glade was less impressive but I think that’s because it can do nothing but pale in comparison to the awe of the maze.

There were some parts of the book that were completely left out. I won’t point out anything very specific because I think you could watch the film, like it, and then go to the book to get another great story that’s slightly different. There was so much between Thomas and Teresa that just wasn’t included, so I don’t know how they’ll skirt around that when it comes to the next movie. I think that overall I wasn’t too annoyed by anything that was taken out of the film because it’s been so long since I’ve read the book. I’ve learned my lesson not to reread the book right before the movie or I’m almost guaranteed to dislike the film!

The great thing about reading the book before the movie? You get to enjoy the theater’s reaction to a plot twist you know is coming. Yeah, maybe I was a little too smug, looking to see how my friends who hadn’t read the book were reacting to what was happening. There was a particularly funny part for me when everyone thought the movie was over, but I knew that the action was just getting started. I feel like with The Maze Runner, which absolutely thrives on plot twists, there’s never any way of knowing where the story’s going to go next.

The ending disappointed me a little. I hate enjoying an adaptation and then leaving the theater unsatisfied because they just needed to change up the ending. It happened with The Giver. Divergent. Now The Maze Runner. The end is important because it’s the last thing I get before I leave so of course I want it to be on a great note. Not that I’m saying they completely changed the end of this; they just left it off at a different part and didn’t go quite as far with the plot as the book does, which is annoying.

Overall, I was so impressed with The Maze Runner that I need the sequel immediately. I’ve heard that they’re planning to make one, but it isn’t coming until 2016. How can I wait that long? If this movie does well in the box office, I’m hoping that means The Scorch Trials will have an even better budget for a greater movie–not that I’m saying the visual effects in this first installment didn’t impress. Far from it. The maze was terrifying realistic and the Grievers . . yep, part of my nightmares now.

I’d recommend this movie to fans of the book, those unsure of whether they want to read the series, and people looking for a movie filled with suspense and action. This is a book that I read and thought would be even cooler as a movie. I’m glad that the film proved me right.

4 stars · dystopia

Rise by Anna Carey

 

Rise

The Eve Trilogy #3
Book 1: Eve
Book 2: Once

author : anna carey

pages : [hardcover] 310

favorite characters : eve & clara

summary :

How far will you go when you have nothing left to lose?

When she lost her soul mate, Caleb, Eve felt like her world had ended. Trapped in the palace, forced to play the part of the happy, patriotic princess of The New America—and the blushing bride of her father’s top adviser—Eve’s whole life is a lie. The only thing that keeps her going is Caleb’s memory, and the revolution he started.

Now, Eve is taking over where Caleb left off. With the help of Moss, an undercover subversive in the King’s court, she plots to take down The New America, beginning with the capital, the City of Sand. Will Eve be able to bring about a new, free world when she’s called upon to perform the ultimate act of rebellion—killing her father?

In Rise, Eve must choose who to leave behind, who to save, and who to fight as Anna Carey’s epic tale of romance and sacrifice in the chilling dystopia of The New America comes to a stunning conclusion.

review :

 This is the last book in the Eve trilogy and I was really looking forward to seeing how the author was going to conclude these books. Rise starts just a few weeks after the conclusion of book two. While I feel like the plot of this book read just as quickly as the other two books, it also lacked the amount of detail and character connections that I’ve been searching for throughout the series and hoped would finally come through in this final novel.

I think that I’ve come to the conclusion that while Rise and the other Eve books are interesting and made me want to know what was going to happen next, they aren’t very memorable as a whole for the dystopian genre. I’m not going to rave about how I love the characters because there is no epic love connection or friendship; characters that I knew that I should care about, I felt like I barely knew. It saddened me because I feel so much potential in the ideas Carey focuses on. I can only hope that her writing will improve and I’ll definitely try more from her in the future.

While I didn’t dislike the way that this book ended, at first it infuriated me. I’d waited that long to have it end like that? Yet the more I sat on it-and it’s been a week since I read it, until I felt able to review the book-the more I liked that ending. It seemed fitting and worked well with the way the rest of the book was written. I can imagine what’s going to happen next and maybe what’s in my mind is even better because I can infuse it with feeling that might not have been there if more had been included in the original text.

Would I recommend this trilogy? Yes, definitely. But it would be more of a dystopian for the summer, a lighter trilogy that doesn’t take a huge attention span or time commitment. I might end up rereading these books in the future; I’ll definitely keep an eye out to see what Carey’s writing in the future. This isn’t the best trilogy, but it’s a good, satisfying one.

4/5 stars

4 stars · dystopia · young adult

Once by Anna Carey

 

Once

Eve #2
Book 1: Eve

author : anna carey

pages : [hardcover] 354

memorable quote Only boring people get bored.

favorite characters : caleb & eve

summary :

When you’re being hunted, who can you trust?

For the first time since she escaped from her school many months ago, Eve can sleep soundly. She’s living in Califia, a haven for women, protected from the terrifying fate that awaits orphaned girls in The New America.

But her safety came at a price: She was forced to abandon Caleb, the boy she loves, wounded and alone at the city gates. When Eve gets word that Caleb is in trouble, she sets out into the wild again to rescue him, only to be captured and brought to the City of Sand, the capital of The New America.

Trapped inside the City walls, Eve uncovers a shocking secret about her past–and is forced to confront the harsh reality of her future. When she discovers Caleb is alive, Eve attempts to flee her prison so they can be together–but the consequences could be deadly. She must make a desperate choice to save the ones she loves . . . or risk losing Caleb forever.

In this breathless sequel to “Eve,” Anna Carey returns to her tale of romance, adventure, and sacrifice in a world that is both wonderfully strange and chillingly familiar.

review :

 I picked this book up right after I finished Eve. I don’t know what it is about these books that have me addicted to them. They aren’t action-packed dystopians, more character and setting based situations. Yet as soon as I picked up Once, it was just like book one: I couldn’t put it down and flew through this book. It was a very quick read, one that I really liked, and something that made me excited for book three.

What made me really happy about book two were the plot twists I couldn’t predict. Sometimes I knew that Eve was making a mistake with some decision she made but I was never certain of how it was going to play out. I feel like there are so many different things at work in these books that are going to completely come together in the third and final book in this trilogy. Once just builds up more suspense and makes me eager to see how things will play out!

The one thing that did annoy me about this book was how Eve’s priorities sometimes seemed skewed. Whenever she wasn’t in immediate danger, she would relax and not think of ways to try to help her friends who were in terrible situations. When she was in trouble, then she would lament about how she would never be able to save anyone else. Sometimes she trusted people she shouldn’t have and did some naive things but most of that can be chalked up to her isolated upbringing. She’s slowly expanding her awareness and realizing that most of what she’s been taught is a lie . . but this book, like the last one, shows how she’s tentatively beginning to think for herself.

I really like these books so far and would really recommend them. They’re quick reads but I think they’re entertaining and nothing like the dystopians I’ve been reading lately. If you’re looking for more action, I wouldn’t head for the Eve trilogy, but if you want interesting characters and great writing, pick these books up!

4/5 stars